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Monday, December 11, 2017

Further Updates Reported on Temples Worldwide

Hello again, everyone! I found out earlier today about some pretty significant temple progress that has been reported in several locations worldwide. This is the first chance I have had to post about those developments, however, as I have spent the better part of my day today resting and recuperating from my ongoing battle with a cold. I apologize for that delay. But I am grateful to be able to pass those developments along right now. Let's dive right in to all of that.

While the cladding process is still ongoing for the Concepcion Chile Temple, it has made progress, and is getting closer to being completed. Interior millwork continues to be installed, while light fixtures are being hung throughout the temple. The dedication of that temple is still only anticipated to occur sometime during the fourth quarter of next year, but the progress is encouraging.

We next turn our attention to the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. As I mentioned a few days ago, this temple has made tremendous progress since full-scale construction began last year. The recent progress for that temple has been that the cupola framework has been installed atop the temple. We may have at least 18 months to wait until that temple is dedicated.

As for the Rio de Janeiro Temple, the upper walls of the temple are in the process of being poured. In the meantime, the Lisbon Portugal Temple is the final one for which I wanted to report progress. At that temple site, while preparations are still underway to pour the steeple base, the construction team also is preparing to pour the base of the steeple as well.

I am so grateful for these small but significant developments. The Lord, as I always say, is clearly controlling those factors dependent on Him that enable such progress to occur, and we have often seen multiple developments occurring very quickly in these processes.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Additional Temple Update: Progress Reported in Fortaleza Brazil

Hello again, everyone! Though the Cedar City Utah Temple dedication was the big temple-related development this weekend, I found an update on the construction status for the Fortaleza Brazil Temple. The framing for the tower has been installed atop that temple. It is amazing to see how quickly things have progressed for this temple, especially since it was stalled for just under five years after its groundbreaking before work began in earnest. That said, we may not see that temple dedicated for the next 20 months minimum. I continue to track any and all developments and will be sure to pass those along as i become aware of them. That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each  one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Cedar City Utah Temple Dedication Held Today

Hello again, everyone! I waited until now to report on the Cedar City Utah Temple dedication because I was waiting for all the news stories I could find on the event. First of all, I wanted to note that the report cited in an earlier post was in error. There were not 9 apostles in attendance at this dedication after all. It appears that President Eyring was only accompanied by Elder Holland from the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. You can find articles about the events of the dedication (as published by the Church News) herehere, and here, and the Mormon Newsroom coverage of the dedicatory events here.

It was amazing to read the reports of this dedication. And this marks the last temple dedication of the current group under construction that is within the US, as well as the fact that, aside from the rededications of the Jordan River Utah Temple (already confirmed for May 20) and the Frankfurt Germany Temple (which is yet to be announced), there will likely not be any new temples dedicated until the 4th quarter of next year.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time, Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Minor Update Reported on the Lisbon Portugal Temple

Hello again, everyone! While the cultural celebration that was held tonight and the dedication that will take place tomorrow are the big temple news items for the next 15-18 hours, I found out just a few moments ago about an update, albeit minor, to the status of the Lisbon Portugal Temple. At that temple site, preparations are being made to pour the base of the steeple, while work continues on the cladding of the adjacent meetinghouse. It is great to see such small and simple strides taking place for temples all around the world, and it amazes me that we hear of such developments as regularly as we do. The Lord is at work in the process of how, when, and in what manner temples progress. I will continue to do my best to bring updates to you all as I become aware of them. That does it for this post, Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Updates

Hello again, everyone! My wife Amy and I have spent most of the last week not feeling well (which in my case has involved a cold that has hung on for a couple of weeks). Our ability to get things done normally has ebbed and flowed each day based on how we have been feeling. So the posts I have done within the last week or so have come when I have had the strength to get them done. We are doing all right, just dealing with a lot, but we will get through it. We have been through worse.

In the absence of new content in recent days, I have been touched by how widely read the posts I have been able to do in the first week of this month, particularly those sharing my thoughts about temple prospects for the near or far distant future.

That said, I did want to send out a reminder: If any of you want to comment on a post I have previously done, I hope you know you can feel free to do so. When I turn my attention to temple possibilities within an area of the Church I have not covered, that is not intended to dissuade any of you who may have additional insights on such possibilities in areas I have already posted. In the last week, the new posts have been written for the purpose of extending and expanding the discussion.

If I have overlooked any possibilities in any area that I should be considering, I want to know about that. Likewise, if I have any possibilities that do not seem to be as likely, I want to know about that as well so I can make any additions or corrections to my list prior to next April's General Conference.

With those preliminaries out of the way, I would like now to turn to the purpose for this post: to provide some updated information of which I have become aware relating to the progress of temples.

In that regard, I wanted to first mention that, in order for the Church to have 200 operating temples by Saturday April 6, 2030, which will coincide with the 200th anniversary of the Church, there are now 12.32 years in which to announce and complete 18 other temples, in addition to the 25 others currently in various stages. That means that if 3-4 new temples are dedicated every full year between now and then, it could easily be done.

That is especially true in light of Elder Wilson's statement about the 80 potential locations for which the Church could announce a temple between now and late April 2032. Even if some of those possibilities are taken off or replaced by others, we may, as I have previously stated, be entering into a time when the Church could opt to announce a few temples every six months in General Conference, and have a few announced here and there between each conference. Whatever does happen in that regard, I will do my best to keep you posted on all of that.

In the meantime, I found out a little more about the Cedar City Utah Temple dedication attendees. As some of you may have seen, the Church News ran this article about how Elder Holland, a Southern Utah boy, would be returning home for the temple's dedication. That same article explains that President Eyring will preside at the dedication. As we also know from a previously published article, 7 other apostles will be participating as well.

We know as well that President Monson will not be in attendance, and we also know (from a comment on this blog) that Elder Renlund is on assignment in New Mexico and will not be in attendance either. So that leaves 10 other possibilities from which those 7 have been selected. I am keeping my eyes out for information about this weekend's events for the Cedar City Utah temple and I will pass anything new on to you all as soon as I can after learning about it.

That said, we now turn our attention to the Barranquilla Colombia Temple, where the roofing for the temple and missionary housing is nearing completion. As previously noted, the monument sign has been installed, and I also learned that scaffolding has been removed from the temple tower and that the installation of decorative fencing is underway on the temple grounds. I can see now more clearly why this temple will likely be dedicated prior to the dedication of the Kinshasa Temple.

Aside from these developments, there has been no other progress reported on temples. That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Temple Site Possibilities: North America Northeast Area

Hello again, everyone! Since I have time to do so tonight, I am back to talk about the current temples within the North America Northeast Area of the Church, and to share my thoughts about where future temples may be built within that same area. With 12 temples in operation in that area (one of which, the Washington D. C. Temple, will close to begin its renovation process on the same day the Jordan River Utah Temple is rededicated (May 20, 2018)), there are no temples announced or under construction within that area. As I begin this post, I have only one other candidate for a temple within that area, but if I see any promising prospects as I talk about the current temple district, I will add them to my list as I go. With that said, let's dive right in to the discussion of the temples in this area.

There are, as mentioned above, 12 temples in the North America Northeast Area. I will be listing them in alphabetical order, with the Canadian temples within that area listed first, and the US temples in that area after that. If any US state or Canadian territory or province has more than one temple, I will be grouping them together.

The three Canadian temples within the borders of this area are as follows: Halifax Nova Scotia, Montreal Quebec, and Toronto Ontario. The other nine temples within that area (that are in the US) are Boston Massachusetts, Columbus Ohio, Detroit Michigan, Hartford Connecticut, Indianapolis Indiana, Manhattan and Palmyra New York, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, and Washington D. C. Which regions are covered within each of these districts, and how many stakes are covered within them? Let's talk next about that.

Again, beginning in Canada, we first turn our attention to the temple in Halifax Nova Scotia. That temple district covers one stake each in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, and the three branches of the Church in Newfoundland. The Montreal Quebec Temple district takes in 4 stakes, 3 of which are in Montreal, with 1 other in Eastern Ontario. The Toronto Ontario Temple district is comprised of 8 stakes and 1 district in Ontario. As previously noted, the smaller Canadian temple districts seem to have Canada fairly well covered with its current temples.

Moving on now to the United States, the Boston Massachusetts Temple district is comprised of 12 stakes, with 5 of those in Massachusetts, 3 in New Hampshire, 2 in Maine, and 1 each in Rhode Island and Vermont.

Next is the Columbus Ohio Temple, which has in its district 16 stakes, 13 of which are in Ohio, with two from Western Pennsylvania (based in Pittsburgh), and 1 in the Southwestern region of West Virginia (Charleston).

The Detroit Michigan Temple district is comprised of 7 stakes and 1 district, all of which are located in Michigan. The Hartford Connecticut Temple district covers 5 stakes in total: 3 in Connecticut, 2 in Eastern New York, and 1 in Western Massachusetts. As for the Indianapolis Indiana Temple, that district covers 9 stakes, 8 in Indiana and 1 in Eastern Illinois.

Turning now to Manhattan New York, that temple district is comprised of 8 stakes in Downstate New York, and 4 in North Jersey. Just as the temple in Manhattan serves New York's Downstate region, the Upstate in New York is served by the Palmyra Temple, which serves 7 stakes and 1 district within that region.

Rounding out the US temples in this area are the Philadelphia Pennsylvania and Washington D. C. Temples. The Philly Temple district covers 7 stakes in Eastern Pennsylvania and two each in Central and South Jersey and Delaware, for a total of 11 stakes. As for Washington D. C., the temple named for the capital of the United States covers 23 stakes in Virginia, 8 in West Virginia, 8 others in Maryland, 3 in Pennsylvania and 2 in West Virginia.

Most of these temple districts seem very reasonably sized to me. I ran the mileage on some of them, and particularly for the smaller states in this area, there don't seem to be any inordinate distances for the members of the Church to travel in order to reach their assigned temple. That said, the one exception I have come up with is Virginia.

A while back on this blog, when I first started sharing my thoughts on future temple locations, I went back and forth for a while on a temple for Virginia, and many people suggested several excellent candidate cities for such a temple. But after doing the research on it, I agree with the many experts on temple matters with whom I have consulted: if and when Virginia does get a temple, the most likely location for it is Richmond.

I imagine that if a temple were built there, it could cover the needs of the Saints in Virginia and West Virginia, at minimum, which would slightly draw at least a few stakes from the surrounding temple districts. If Richmond does get a temple, then the North America Northeast Area may be well stocked with temples for the immediate future.

But that is merely my own opinion. Let me know your thoughts. Have I overlooked anything? Is it reasonable to assume that Richmond is likely to get a temple? I look forward to hearing from any of you that would like to share your opinion.

That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.



Temple Site Possibilities: North America Central Area, Part Two: Potential Future Temples

Hello again, everyone! Having set the background in my previous post for what the current temple districts in the North America Central Area cover, we now turn our attention to potential future temples. The possibilities I will suggest mainly qualify for a temple due to the distances involved from their currently assigned temples.

While again bearing in mind that the US in general is going through a period of stagnated growth, I have felt that we could see temples announced very soon in the following locations within the North America Central Area: Missoula Montana, Green Bay Wisconsin, and Rapid City South Dakota.  Let's talk a bit about each.

I have previously referenced the fact that I heard from someone that a temple had been publicly proposed for Missoula by Elder David A. Bednar last year or the year before. While I have not been able to verify that, I do know that the Missoula Saints, who are assigned currently to the Spokane Washington Temple (which is not within the same geographical area of the Church) travel a distance of 197.3 miles. I would think that since that is just short of President Monson's stated goal to have every member within 200 miles of a temple, Missoula would qualify for its own temple in that regard. When we add the public proposal in, that makes a Missoula temple seem even more likely.

Next, we move on to Wisconsin. When I was originally considering a temple for that state, I was absolutely convinced that Milwaukee would be the best place for it. After all, 2 of the 6 stakes in that state are based in Milwaukee, the capital city. But then several people pointed out that the Green Bay area of Wisconsin was more likely to be the best location for a temple in Wisconsin. Subsequent personal study on my part verified that completely. Saints in the Green Bay area currently fall under the Chicago Illinois district, and the distance between the two cities is 208.7. According to President Monson's goal, Green Bay qualifies for its own temple.

Finally, we move on to South Dakota. A temple in that state could rise in Rapid City. I favor this location for a couple of reasons. My dad served his mission there, and beyond that, the Saints in South Dakota travel 300.7 miles to their assigned temple in Bismarck.

These are the possibilities I came up with, and the reasons behind them. Feel free to "sound off" in the comments below with any I have missed, or if any of you feel that I should eliminate any of these. That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Site Possibilities: North America Central Area--Part One: Current Temple Districts

Hello again, everyone! I thought I would take some time right now to continue my series of posts about temple possibilities by putting together some thoughts about the North America Central Area. Because there are 14 temples currently operating within that area, with 1 more (the Winnipeg Manitoba Temple) that has been announced and is awaiting full-scale construction efforts to begin: that is anticipated to happen sometime during April or May next year. As I said yesterday in my preliminary post about the areas of the Church that cover North America, the US has entered a period of nationwide stagnated growth, with the exception of the strongholds comprising the "Mormon corridor"

I also wanted to reiterate what I said yesterday in my post about the North America Areas: that the one difficulty with those areas is that the boundary lines for the areas do not correspond with those for the state, province, and territorial boundaries within the US and Canada. That said, the temple district boundaries in the North America Central area are fairly specific in what is covered. When I get to my next post (which will discuss the temple possibilities I see for this area), I may have possibilities listed that are not actually part of that area because of the existing boundaries. Just wanted to note that before I go any further.

Now, let's dive right in to talking about the 15 temples in the North America Central Area, including what each of those 15 temple districts cover. I will follow this post up with another one later today or sometime tomorrow that will go into specifics about the future possibilities I see for this area. There are three of them, and I will explain those choices in that next post.

The 15 temples falling within the North America Central Area are as follows (note that I am listing the Canadian temples before the US ones, and that if a province, territory or state has more than one, they are all listed in a group): Calgary, Cardston, and Edmonton Alberta;  Regina Saskatchewan; Winnipeg Manitoba; Billings Montana; Bismarck North Dakota; Chicago and Nauvoo Illinois; Denver and Fort Collins Colorado; Kansas City and St. Louis Missouri; St. Paul Minnesota; and Winter Quarters Nebraska.

Let's talk briefly about each of those temple districts. We begin in Canada, where we turn our focus first to Alberta, which has three temples total, in Calgary, Cardston, and Edmonton. In addition to the three temples, Alberta has two missions of the Church (in Calgary and Edmonton) and 25 stakes, which are further divided into 191 wards and 33 branches, for a total of 224 congregations.

In terms of each of the three districts, I have found out the following information: the Calgary Alberta Temple only covers the 7 stakes within that province. As for the Cardston Temple district, it is comprised of the 15 stakes within southern Alberta, northern Montana, and the British Colombian Rockies. One of the future temple possibilities I will discuss in my next post would draw away some stakes from this temple district.  And the Edmonton Temple district is made up of the 7 stakes in Central and Northern Alberta.

Next, the Regina Saskatchewan Temple serves the Saints within the two stakes of the Church in Saskatchewan and the one that is located in Winnipeg. The Manitoba Saints currently have to journey to the Regina Saskatchewan Temple to worship, a distance of 355.9 miles. So it would seem that the announcement of the Winnipeg Temple was mostly (if not entirely) motivated by a desire to provide those Saints a temple in their midst.

We now turn our attention to the US temples within this area. The Billings Montana Temple serves 7 stakes in Billings and the surrounding regions of Montana and 4 stakes in Wyoming. The Bismarck North Dakota Temple serves Saints in the 4 stakes and 1 district in both North and South Dakota.

In Illinois, there are two temples currently, one in Chicago, and one in Nauvoo. The Chicago Temple serves a total of 14 stakes, 7 in Northern Illinois, 5 in Wisconsin, one in Northern Indiana, and one in Southwestern Michigan. As for the Nauvoo Temple, its district takes in 5 stakes in Eastern Iowa and West Central Illinois.

Next, as mentioned above, we  come to Colorado. The Denver temple serves those Saints that are in 19 stakes, 18 in Colorado, and one in Western Kansas. The Fort Collins Temple serves the 13 stakes found within Northern Colorado and Southeastern Wyoming.

Turning now to Missouri, the two temples in the state are located in Kansas City and St. Louis. The Kansas City temple serves those Saints within the 10 stakes in Western Missouri, and Northeastern Kansas. The St. Louis Missouri Temple district is comprised of 10 stakes, 8 in Eastern Missouri, and 2 in Southern Illinois

The St. Paul Temple district serves 8 stakes in Minnesota, 1 in Wisconsin, and 1 district in Northwestern Ontario. The Winter Quarters Nebraska Temple serves a total of 10 stakes, 5 of which are in Iowa, 4 of which are in Nebraska, and the last of which is in Southeastern South Dakota.

Again, this is just a very general overview of the current temple districts to set the background for my next post, in which I will discuss the prospects I see for future temples within this area. That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.


Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Transcripts Now Available for addresses from the First Presidency's Christmas Devotional

Hello again, everyone! After having kept an eye out since yesterday for them, I learned today that the transcripts for the addresses given during the First Presidency's Christmas Devotional are now available. You can find them here. That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

A Preliminary Word on the North America Areas of the Church

Hello again, everyone! After a few day's hiatus to post Church and temple news that has crossed my radar in recent days, I am in the preliminary stages of putting together my thoughts about temple prospects for each of the Church's areas in North America. Before I share anything in that regard, I wanted to note that because the boundary lines of the North American areas of the Church are drawn the way they are, we have many states in the US and provinces and territories in Canada where the majority of such regions may fall under one area, while smaller portions of those regions may fall under another. Because of that, the temple possibilities I see for these areas will be listed according to the area in which most of these states, provinces and territories fall, even if the temple location might be in a different area of the Church. Hope that makes sense.

I am using this post to share some thoughts on a distinct part of North America that I do not see getting any additional temples anytime soon. The area of which I speak is the territories that comprise Canada. In preparing to share my thoughts on North America, I did some research into Canada. And that research seems indicative that the temple district that are now (or in the case of the Winnipeg Manitoba Temple, will be) in place in that region seem to be more than enough for Canada's needs for the moment.

The temple districts are fairly small and very manageable with their current sizes, and, from my study, It also seems to me that the Church is well stocked on temples that are scattered through Canada and  and serve parts of the United States in which they border. I don't see anywhere the Church is established in Canada that is not within an easy distance of a temple. That said, I freely admit that my study is far from perfect. Always has been and always will be, so if there is anything I have overlooked, please let me know.

With all of that said, I am looking forward to going into detail on the current and potential future temple districts within the North American areas of the Church. The United States is one of many places where my list of possibilities has shrunk, then expanded, then shrunk, then expanded again. Having been encouraged to expand my net of US temple possibilities (while at the same time keeping in mind that, except in the Mormon corridor of Idaho, Arizona, and Utah (though it technically also includes Nevada and the regions of California comprising San Bernardino), the US in general is in a period of stagnated growth). With all of that in mind, I will hopefully be able to take some time between now and the Christmas holidays to cover North American temple possibilities.

I am currently dealing with a minor illness that may slow me down somewhat, but if nothing else, I will do my level best to be sure and complete the North America posts before the end of the year. It all depends on what happens between now and then and how much time and energy I can devote to such posts. That said, it has touched me how interested you, my readers, seem to be in the posts about potential future temple locations. That is clearly a subject close to many hearts, and I am grateful for the wonderful feedback I have received on the posts I have done in this series so far.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.


Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Update on recent temple-related developments

Hello again, everyone! I am grateful for the opportunity to post today and share some significant and amazing developments that have occurred with various temples worldwide. There is a lot to unpack here, so let's get right into it.

First, I am pleased to report additional progress on the Barranquilla Colombia Temple. While the process of laying sod and sidewalk pavers continues, roofing is going in for both the temple and housing facility. Additionally, the monument sign has been installed on the temple grounds. I can now see clearly why many have said that this temple will be the second new one dedicated next year.

Next, I realized today that in my last update on the Durban South Africa Temple I had unintentionally omitted some details from the construction status. The framing is under way on the interior, drywall is being hung, window frames are being fitted, brick is being laid around the pillars, and concrete is being poured for the veranda on the missionary housing facility.

The next temple I want to talk about is the Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple. While no progress has been reported since I posted twice about how it started, I forgot that I had not given a potential time-frame for that temple's completion. since work officially got underway. We know that that construction process is anticipated to take between 12-18 months, so I have set mid-June 2019 as a preliminary estimate for that temple;s dedication. That said, I could see a reason to move that estimate up a bit, depending on how consistently progress is reported on that process.

At the Arequipa Peru Temple site, since the exterior has been completed, the foundation is being backfilled and interior work has started. Because this temple has progressed so steadily in its construction, I can see why there is reason to believe that a dedication could occur before the end of 2019 rather than a few months later, as 2020 begins. With this and all other temples, I am keeping an eye out for any updated information, and I will do my best to pass any updates along as I receive them.

I have also felt that the private rededication that will be held for the Houston Texas Temple following its period of restoration and renovation could take place in June of next year, all going well. I will be sure to pass along any updates to this estimate as I find out more.

The final thing I want to discuss in this post is the dates on which temples are anticipated to close next year. I check my favorite Church sites every day before I check this blog, so when I did so, I was not aware that there was a comment on this blog indicating that the last day the Raleigh North Carolina Temple would be open is Saturday January 6. But thanks to the comment on this blog about that subject, I can now confirm that the closure of that temple is effective Sunday January 7. In the meantime, I also found out that the Mesa Arizona Temple is set to close for its renovation on Sunday May 20, which is the same day on which the Jordan River Utah Temple will be rededicated. It is exciting to have learned all of this.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Monday, December 4, 2017

President Trump Visits With LDS Church Leaders during his Utah trip/Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple Renovation Closure Corrected

Hello again, everyone! As some of you may be aware, President Donald Trump had a brief trip to Utah today to announce changes to two national monuments here in Utah. The visit, arranged by Senior Utah Senator Orrin Hatch (who is a Church member and third in the presidential line of succession), included a visit to Welfare Square and a meeting with President Henry B. Eyring, First Counselor in the First Presidency, President Russell M. Nelson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, Presiding Bishop Gerald Causse, and Relief Society General President Jean B. Bingham. Among the topics discussed were the importance of religious freedom, and how the Church cares for the needs of its members and their friends of other faiths. President Trump seemed very impressed and touched, both by the time these Church leaders gave him, and with the opportunity to gain a more complete understanding of all the Church does to help not only its own members, but also friends of other faiths. I attempted to write a summary of all that transpired, but found that nothing I put together does it justice, so I refer anyone who would like more details on this to the Church News article, which can be found here.

In other news, I mentioned on this blog a while ago that the January 10 and February 1 dates for the renovation closures of the Raleigh North Carolina and Baton Rouge Louisiana Temples were likely subject to change. While I am still waiting for word on the correct date for the Raleigh closure, it appears that the Church has identified Sunday January 28 as a more exact date for the Baton Rouge renovation closure. That makes sense in light of the fact that we have generally seen such closures begin between Friday and Monday. I am keeping an eye out for the exact dates of both the Raleigh North Carolina and Mesa Arizona closures and will post those as soon as I have them.

That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

More Information Provided on Cedar City Utah Temple Dedication; more specific information pending

Hello again, everyone! As many of you may be aware, the dedication of the Cedar City Utah Temple will be held this weekend. I have wondered periodically who all might be in attendance from the general Church leadership, and we now know a little bit more about that. While no specific leaders have been identified as of yet, this article explains that there will be 9 of the 14 current apostles (the article says 15, but does not account for Elder Hales's death) participating during the three dedicatory sessions. That brings up an interesting question: who might those 9 be?

We know that President Monson likely won't be able to attend, which leaves 13 others that could. We also know that it has been several years since any temple dedication or rededication has been attended by every member of the First Presidency, so I think it may be safe to assume that only one First Presidency member may attend, and since President Uchtdorf presided at the dedications of the Tucson Arizona and Meridian Idaho Temples, it would make sense if President Eyring presided at this one. I am not ruling out both President Eyring and President Uchtdorf being in attendance at one or two sessions each, but it seems unlikely. We also know that the Church likes to spread out attendance at temple-related events so everyone has an equal opportunity to participate.

With that in mind, we also know that Elder Neil L. Andersen accompanied President Eyring to the dedication of the Paris France temple (in view of Elder Andersen's ties to France as a former missionary and mission president there), so he may not be involved with this dedication. Likewise, Elder Ronald A. Rasband accompanied President Eyring for the rededication of the Idaho Falls Idaho Temple, so he might  not be involved in the dedication of Utah's newest temple. The same might be true for Elder Gary E. Stevenson, who accompanied President Uchtdorf to the dedication of the Tucson Arizona Temple dedication, and Elder D. Todd Christofferson, who accompanied President Uchtdorf to the dedication of the Meridian Idaho Temple.

Having said all this, if I am correct, then the apostles participating in this event could be President Henry B. Eyring, President Russell M. Nelson, Elder Dalin H. Oaks, M. Russell Ballard, Jeffrey R. Holland, David A. Bednar, Quentin L. Cook, and Dale G. Renlund. I also anticipate the participation of several other Church leaders, including Elder L. Whitney Clayton, Senior President of the Seventy, who presided at this temple's groundbreaking, Elder Craig C. Christensen, who oversees the three Utah areas of the Church, a representative or two from the Temple Department, and other leaders, including a representative from the Presiding Bishopric.

But these are just my thoughts. It is now your turn to "sound off" in the comments below with your thoughts. That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Sunday, December 3, 2017

Report on the First Presidency's Christmas Devotional

Hello again, everyone! I am posting briefly tonight with a recap of the First Presidency's Christmas Devotional. President Henry B. Eyring presided at and conducted the devotional, sending season's greetings on behalf of the First Presidency. Sister Reyna I. Aburto offered the invocation. Music was provided by the Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square. Surprisingly, there were only three speakers at this devotional, which may be the new normal.

We heard from Sister Christina B. Franco, Second Counselor in the Primary General Presidency (you can find the Church news summary of her remarks here), Elder Kevin R. Duncan of the Seventy (the Church News summarized his remarks in this article), and President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency (whose remarks are summarized here). The Mormon Newsroom article covering the entire devotional can be found here.

President Uchtdorf also shared an expression of President Monson's love and greetings to all Church members. At the end of the devotional, the benediction was offered by Brother Brian K. Ashton, Second Counselor in the Sunday School General Presidency.

I always say this every year, but I absolutely loved this year's Christmas Devotional. I am so grateful that we have this opportunity each year to hear messages specifically about the Christmas season at the beginning of each December.

That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland Celebrates His 77th Birthday Today

Hello again, everyone! I am back as promised with a post written in honor of Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, who is celebrating his 77th birthday today. Elder Holland has long been one of my favorite apostles, and I have a couple of familial connections to him. My dad was born and raised in St. George, and his father (Dean Stokes), was Elder Holland's home teaching companion when "young Jeff" was an Aaronic Priesthood holder.

According to my dad, his father often expressed his wonder that a boy like Elder Holland had been could become an apostle of the Lord. I know that at times, it may seem that each member of the Church, to a certain degree, may put the leading Brethren of the Church on a pedestal, but I am reminded in accounts such as that shared by my grandpa that these men may have been foreordained to the apostleship, but they are no different than any other member of the Church; the Lord just ordered their lives based on their personal choices in such a way that when such calls came to them, they were qualified through years of service in the Church and living what they believe. That is important for all of us to remember.

I also have another indirect connection to Elder Holland. My mom is a freelance proofreader, and in the early days of her marriage to my dad, she worked on many projects for the Church Educational System. Since that occurred at the time when Elder Holland was the Commissioner of the CES, he was essentially my mom's "boss." And she speaks warmly of the experiences she had working with him.

Personal connections aside, I wanted to share a brief biographical sketch of Elder Holland. Jeffrey Roy Holland was born in St. George, Utah to Frank D. and Alice Bentley Holland on December 3, 1940. He served full-time in the British Mission. His mission president was Marion D. Hanks, who later served in the First Quorum and Presidency of the Seventy. One of his companions was Quentin L. Cook, with whom he would later serve in the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Upon his return from his mission, he married his high school sweetheart, Patricia Terry, in 1963. They are the parents of a daughter and two sons, one of whom, Matthew, serves currently as the President of Utah Valley University, though he will resign from that assignment next year to serve as a mission president.  Elder Holland attended BYU, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s degree in religious education.

He went on to earn a doctorate degree in American studies from Yale. He then became a professor at BYU, serving as Dean of the College of Religion. He served as Commissioner of Church Education from 1976-1980, then served as president of BYU until his call as a General Authority.

Elder Holland has served as a bishop, counselor in a stake presidency, and regional representative. He was sustained a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy on April 1, 1989. After the First Presidency was reorganized following the death of President Ezra Taft Benson, President Howard W. Hunter took immediate action to fill the apostolic vacancy. In the space of a few short hours on June 23, President Hunter issued a call to the apostleship to Elder Holland, gave him his apostolic charge, set apart and ordained him to that calling,  and had him join the other 14 apostles in their weekly meeting at the temple. That action was sustained by Church membership during the Solemn Assembly that was held less than three months later.

Elder Holland gave 3 talks prior to his apostolic call (one of which he gave in April 1983 as president of BYU during the Priesthood Session, with his son (a teacher at the time) also speaking during that session. And since his call to the apostleship, he has spoken 47 additional times, meaning he has given 50 addresses altogether in General Conference. To review any of these wonderful addresses, click here. While I love and sustain all the Brethren, I have found that Elder Holland's talks always affect me more.

Some of my favorites among those 50 in recent years have been None Were With Him (from the Easter Sunday Morning Session of the April 2009 General Conference); Lord, I Believe (from the Sunday Afternoon Session of the April 2013 General Conference); and Songs Sung and Unsung (from the Saturday Afternoon Session of the April 2017 General Conference).

The last thing I want to mention about Elder Holland is that he is currently the 4th senior member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and the 5th most senior of our 14 apostles. He is also the 5th oldest member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, and is the 8th oldest of the 14 apostles, meaning that he is the oldest of the youngest half of our current apostles.

I am grateful for the life and ministry of Elder Holland, and although he may not ever read this, I am also grateful for the chance I had to write this post in tribute to his birthday today. That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Update provided on Fortaleza Brazil Temple

Hello again, everyone! As you may remember, I mentioned yesterday that today I intended to post a birthday tribute to Elder Holland, who celebrates his 77th today, and I also shared my intention to post an update on apostolic age and tenure information. While I am still planning to do so later on today (in addition to posting a recap of the First Presidency's Christmas Devotional), I became aware of an updated status for the Fortaleza Brazil Temple that I wanted to post about right away.

For those following along, when I last posted an update on that temple, I noted that the exterior of the temple was receiving its stone cladding, and that the steeple had been attached to the adjoining meetinghouse. That update was provided 8 days ago on this blog. Today I learned that while stone cladding continues on the temple, a similar stone cladding is being attached to the patron housing facility, and that the roof of the adjoining meetinghouse is being placed.

It is amazing to see the day-to-day progress that occurs on many temples under construction. I have loved following that progress for several years, and I treasure the opportunity to pass such developments along to you, my readers, and I appreciate your interest in things that I have felt inspired to "sound off" about in such posts.

That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post (which will be put up later today), I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Saturday, December 2, 2017

A Christmas Message to My Readers

Hello again, everyone! The last couple of days have been somewhat crazy for my wife and myself, as we have been dealing with colds or low-grade viruses. For that reason, I have not been able to blog about some of the Church news that has come out that I feel deserves to be focused on in a post dedicated to that subject. I may go back in a day or two and share some of those; a lot will depend on how much time and energy I can devote to that. In the meantime, before moving to the topic of this post, I wanted to note for any that are not aware that I did finish my series of posts on the Mexico Area, and if any of you would be willing to give me your feedback on the possible sites I mentioned, I would love to hear from you.

In the meantime, as I'm sure you all are aware, the First Presidency's Christmas Devotional is set for tomorrow evening, and tomorrow is also Elder Jeffrey R. Holland's 77th birthday, so at minimum, I will be doing posts covering both of those milestones at some point tomorrow. And if I can get it done, I also hope to post an update on apostolic age information. If I can make all that happen tomorrow, I will.

For now, because there has not been any reported temple developments, I wanted to take the opportunity to share a Christmas message with you, my readers, who so faithfully look at any new content I post here.

In doing so, after offering a few preliminary thoughts, I will do what I have done in the past couple of years: share a poem that was featured on the December newsletter of my parent's ward years ago when I was a teenager. I will then pass along a link to the First Presidency's Christmas Message, and close with my testimony. Let's get into all of that.

Before sharing the poem, I wanted to note a couple of things. I have heard it said by many beloved Church leaders that, without Christmas, there would be no Easter. Were it not for the baby born in Bethlehem, there would have been no Atonement, crucifixion, or resurrection. Christmas day is the one day per year where we celebrate the Savior's birth. While scripture and religious scholars have clarified that the Savior's birth took place in April (the Doctrine and Covenants tells us that April 6 is His actual birthday. But because a majority of Christian religions mark his birthday on December 25, that day is set aside for that reason.

However, in recent years, Christmas has become more commercial in nature, and so many people who are either not religiously active or who are not associated with any religion whatsoever, and even many who are very religiously minded, lose sight of the reason for the season, and focus more on what they are receiving from others, rather than what they are giving to both their fellowman and the Savior. If that attitude describes any of us, I hope with all my heart that we will ever remember that Christ is the reason for the season.

Additionally, it is not enough for us as Latter-day Saints to merely celebrate the birth and resurrection of the Savior. As we have been taught frequently, all of us should be hoping and preparing for the time when the Savior will come again and begin His millennial reign on the earth. We know that, in that day, every knee will bow, and every tongue will confess that Jesus is the Christ.

With all of that in mind, the poem I want to share speaks volumes about the importance of our personal preparation for that sacred day when He will come again. The poem follows below:

‘Twas the Night Before the Savior Came

‘Twas the night before Our Savior came and all through the house,
Not a person was praying, not one in the house.
Their scriptures were lain on the shelf without care,
Thinking Our Savior would not come there.
And Mom in her rocker with baby on her lap
Was watching the late show, while I took a nap.
Where out of the East there arose such a clatter,
I sprang to my feet to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash!
When what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But angels proclaiming that our Savior was here!
With a light like the sun sending forth a bright ray,
I knew in a moment it must be the day!
The beauty of His face made me cover my head,
It was Our Savior returning just like he said....
And though I possessed worldly wisdom and wealth,
I cried when I saw Him in spite of myself.
In the Book of Life which He held in His hand,
Was written the names of every saved man.
He spoke not a word, as He searched for my name.
Then He said, “It’s not here.” My head hung in shame.
The people whose names had been written with love,
He gathered to take to His father above.
With those who were read, He rose without a sound,
While all the rest were left standing around.
I fell to my knees, but it was too late.
I had waited too long and thus sealed my fate.
I stood and cried as they rose out of sight,
“Oh, if only I’d been ready tonight.”
In the words of this poem, the meaning is clear,
The coming of Our Savior is drawing near.
There is only one life and when comes the last call,

We will find that the scriptures were true, after all....

With the words of that poem in mind, I would like to offer a couple of observations. First, as I have mentioned a few times, my patriarchal blessing tells me that we are in the Saturday evening of time, which I term to be sometime between 5-8 pm. That means that in a few short hours (however long they may seem to us), the Savior will come again. I hope and pray that each of us will be ready when that happens.

As has been the custom for longer than I have been alive, the First Presidency of the Church sent out a Christmas message for this year, which can be found here. I think their own wording of that message speaks more of the importance of Christmas than I could.

I wanted to end with a final thought and my testimony. The Christmas season is meant to be a time of "peace on earth" and "good will to all men". But the only way it will be so is if each of us, in whatever way we are able to do so, retain in remembrance the vital link between Christmas, Easter, and the eventual Second Coming of the Savior. 

As this Christmas season commences, I gratefully and wholeheartedly testify that Jesus Christ was born in Bethlehem, bore our sins, sorrows, and trials in Gethsemane, was crucified on the cross at Calvary, and rose again the third day after breaking the bands of death for all mankind. His incomparable gift means for all of us that death is not an end, that separation from our departed loved ones is only of a temporary duration, and that one day, each of us will be called upon to answer for how well we have remembered and served Him in our daily lives. 

And the best way we can do that in this Christmas season and during the rest of each year is by reaching out to rescue those who cannot do so themselves, by sanctifying ourselves through service, and by retaining in remembrance that Christ is the reason for this Christmas season. That this may be our blessing and privilege during this Christmas season and always is my humble prayer, in the name of Jesus Christ Amen.


Friday, December 1, 2017

Additional Update Provided for Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple

Hello again, everyone! Today is a prime example of how much things can change for a temple within a 12-24 hour period. While I found out just a few hours ago that the Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple was having its site graded and cleared, I just learned that another report has come in for that temple. While the site grading continues, excavation is being done for the foundation of the temple. Since that much occurred in the few hours since I last checked, I can definitely see why this temple may only have a 12-18 month construction process. I don't anticipate that temple being completed any earlier than early-too-mid 2019, but if construction continues to progress the way it has in just the last few hours, anything seems possible. I am keeping my eyes open for information on all of this and will post additional updates as they are needed. That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Full-scale construction begins on the Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple

Hello again, everyone! I am pleased to be able to report that full-scale construction has officially begun on the Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple. As I have previously mentioned, the construction process on that temple is anticipated to only take 12-18 months. Right now, the completion estimate is for early-to-mid 2019, but depending on how things go, that could either be done sooner or later than that time-frame. I will be keeping my eyes open for developments in this regard, and will pass such information along as I receive it. That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Important Temple Construction Updates

Hello again, everyone! I am back as promised a few minutes ago to share updates on temples that came to my attention not more than three hours ago. There have been some game-changing developments in that regard. So let's dive right in and discuss what those are and why they are significant.

First, when I last reported a status change in the status of the Concepcion Chile Temple, I noted that the cladding around the temple was nearing completion, that lampposts were being installed, and that plants and trees were being added to the temple grounds. The update provided in the late-night hours of November 30 is that interior millwork is underway.

Next we turn our attention to the Barranquilla Colombia Temple. That is not an error or typo. Apparently there is now reason to believe that that temple will be dedicated prior to the dedication of the Kinshasa DR Congo Temple. Temples switching numbers as a result of those that were further down the list progressing more consistently than the temples that were above them,.

That does not mean that the temples that are moved down are not progressing at all, just that those that used to be below them have progressed with more consistency. We have seen that happen a lot, from the speedy construction process for the Star Valley Wyoming Temple to how the Tucson Arizona Temple was dedicated before both the Meridian Idaho and Cedar City Utah Temple, despite the fact that the newest Idaho and Utah temples were anticipated for quite a while to be dedicated first.

While the status of the Barranquilla Colombia still includes the fact that the Angel Moroni was installed atop its spire, I also found out that sod sidewalk pavers are being laid. Once a temple reaches that status, it is approaching the time when it is far enough along that a dedication can be announced. Not quite there yet, but I've followed such things long enough to know that a dedication announcement could occur within the next six months.

In the meantime, perhaps the biggest reason the Kinshasa DR Congo Temple was moved below the Barranquilla Colombia is because the baptismal font needed to be poured again. And because that has delayed the process, the completion estimate for the Kinshasa Temple has been changed to either late 2018 or early 2019. I still think it will be dedicated before the end of 2018, and that Rome will be the first new temple dedicated in 2019.

But the estimates have changed so many times now that I cannot say for certain whether any of these temples that are anticipated to be the next four to be dedicated will be completed within these adjusted time-frames. That said, I am keeping an eye out for any and all updates on any and all temples, whether they are under construction, announced, or undergoing renovation, and I will be sure to pass along any new information as I become aware of it.

That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Temple Site Possibilities: Mexico Area, Part Three--Potential Future Temples

Hello again, everyone! After taking some personal time to see my PCP and to deal with personal illness yesterday (November 30), I became aware just a few hours ago about some potentially game-changing information regarding temples that are under construction. I will do another post  right after this one is published to discuss what those changes are, and what they might mean for the future, but I feel I would be doing all of you a disservice if I did not first focus on the third and final part of my posts about the Mexico Area. This post will cover future temple prospects that I have on my radar, some of which were not on my list before I began studying the Mexico Area.

First, I wanted to note that I began with three potential sites for that area: Puebla, Queretaro, and perhaps a second for Mexico City as well. But I subsequently learned that the Mexico City Temple has some issues with attendance numbers (that information was provided by one of my readers who lives in Mexico). So I eliminated a second temple for Mexico City, at least for now. So that left me with Puebla and Queretaro. As i did further study, I found two other potential locations: San Luis Potosi, and Acapulco (in the state of Guerrero). Each of these is currently within the Mexico City Mexico Temple District. Let's talk about my reasons for including each one

I have heard from many that Mexico's next temple will be built in Puebla. Though that city is only 81.7  miles from its assigned temple, a temple in Puebla would help cover the units currently served by the Mexico City Mexico Temple. And such a temple in that city makes sense because, at minimum, it would serve the 2 missions, 13 stakes and 1 district, which in turn have 89 wards and 27 branches, for a total of 116 congregations. I could definitely see why the Church would opt for a temple there.

The case for a temple in Queretaro is likewise strong. That state is 135.9 miles away from Mexico City, and would be almost twice that far (207.9 miles) from the Puebla Temple, meaning that if a Puebla Temple drew away from the Mexico City Temple, Queretaro would stay within that district until that state had a temple of its own. That state qualifies for a temple mainly for convenience, as the Church only has 1 mission and 3 stakes in its boundaries, which are divided into 20 wards and 3 branches.

For the next location I see getting a temple, we move to the state of Guerrero, and I am thinking that any temple built there would be in the city of Acapulco, which is one of Mexico's prominent cities. While the state has no missions, there are 4 stakes and 1 district within it, and 2 of those stakes are in Acapulco. The stakes and districts further branch off into 26 wards and 12 branches, for a total of 38 congregations. Additionally, Acapulco is also 235.3 miles.away from Mexico City, would be 278.8 miles away from a temple in Puebla, and would be 366.9 miles from a temple in Queretaro. So Acapulco has a strong case for a temple as well.

I added San Luis Potosi for a few reasons. Though that city has only 3 stakes, there are 21 wards and 8 branches (a total of 29 congregations), Saints in that city have to travel 259.1 miles to the Mexico City Mexico Temple. It is also 329.9 miles away from Puebla, but it would likely fall within the temple district in Queretaro, at least initially, since the two are 131.1 miles apart. And Acapulco is 491 miles from San Luis Potosi.

Even with those locations above that I had on my list, and with those I have added, I am sure there are several locations in Mexico that are deserving of a temple. If I have missed any likely possibilities, or if any of you see a good reason I should eliminate any of them, let me know.

That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. I will be back in a few minutes to share the temple updates I talked about at the beginning of this post. Until then, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Site Possibilities: Mexico Area, Part Two--Composition of Current Temple Districts

Hello again, everyone! To continue with the second of the three posts I have planned to cover the Mexico Area, we now turn our attention to the composition of the current temple districts. Again, I am going to be approaching this topic by chronology rather than alphabetically. Let's dive right in to that.

The Mexico City Mexico Temple District, as it now stands, contains 88 stakes and 4 districts from Estado de Mexico, Distrito Federal, Puebla, Hidalgo, Morelos, Guerrero, Michoacan, Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, Tlaxcala, and Guanajuato. That is, in my opinion, a huge district that could be split, perhaps several ways. I will share more of my thoughts on how that might happen in my next post.

The Colonial Juarez Chihuahua Mexico Temple District covers two stakes in Western Chihuahua and Northeastern Sonora. Not much need for additional temples there, at least not for the moment. The same can be said for the Ciudad Juarez Mexico Temple District, which covers 12 stakes and 2 districts in Chihuahua Mexico and Far West Texas (stakes in El Paso).

The Hermosillo Sonora Mexico Temple District is slightly larger than the previous two, covering the Sonora and Sinaloa regions, including the 10 stakes and 6 districts in those regions. The Oaxaca Temple District covers Oaxaca and Southeastern Puebla, with a total of 6 stakes and 5 districts.

The Tuxtla Guitierrez Temple  District takes in 7 stakes and 6 districts in Chiapas and Southeastern Oaxaca. The Tampico Mexico Temple District, which covers the 13 stakes and 2 districts located in Southern Tamaulipas, Northern Veracruz, Eastern San Luis Potosi and Eastern Hidalgo.

The Villahermosa Temple District is made up of the 9 stakes and 1 district within Southeastern Veracruz, Tabasco, and Southwestern Campeche. The Merida Temple District is comprised of 13 stakes and 2 districts located in Yucatan, Quintana Roo and Northern Campeche.

The Veracruz Temple District takes in the 12 stakes and 1 district in Veracruz, Northeastern Oaxaca, and Northeastern Puebla. The Guadalajara Temple District covers 20 stakes and 5 districts located throughout Jalisco, Aguascalientes, Durango, Guanajuato, Michoacan, Zacatecas, Colima, Nayarit, and Sinaloa.

The Monterrey Temple District contains 28 stakes and 6 districts, headquartered in Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Northern Tamaulipas, and Northeastern Durango. And the newest Mexican Temple, in Tijuana, covers the 12 stakes within Baja California, Baja California Sur, and Northwestern Sonora.

As you can see from this information, the Church has tried to spread most of these temples so that the districts are smaller than they would otherwise be. I have some thoughts about future temple candidates, and I will pass those along later today. In the meantime, I hope this information is interesting to some of you..

That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Temple Site Possibilities: Mexico Area, Part One--Area Unit Statistics and Temple Histories

Hello again, everyone! I am back yet again with my next post in the series exploring future temple prospects. This post will discuss the statistical data for the Mexico Area of the Church, and provide a history of the events that have culminated in the 13 temples now in operation there. I will follow that up with a second post for this area discussing the current temple districts in that area, and conclude with a third post detailing the possibilities I see for sites that could be announced in the near future. Let's dive right in to all of that.

Within the Mexico Area of the Church, there are 13 temples, 34 missions 229 stakes, and 42 districts. Those stakes and districts break down into substantially large numbers, with the 1,506 wards and 481 branches totaling 1,987 congregations. If we divide that total equally between the 13 temples, that averages out to an average of 152 or 153 congregations for each temple district. That is huge by any definition.

Let us now turn our attention to the actual size of each of the 13 temple districts within the Mexico Area. Some may suggest that the best way to do that is to discuss them in alphabetical order. But I have felt a better approach is to discuss them chronologically by their dedication dates. After I do so, I will discuss the areas each temple district covers. First, I wanted to note that there are 4 sets of two Mexican Temples that were dedicated on consecutive days, and one other set of two that were dedicated just about a year apart.

The Mexico City Mexico Temple became the 26th operating temple of the Church when it was  dedicated during December 2-4, 1983 as the first temple in Mexico by President Gordon B. Hinckley, the only functioning member of the First Presidency at the time. Following its first renovation, it was rededicated on November 16, 2008 by President Thomas S. Monson, who had not yet been President of the Church for a year at the time. After another renovation was completed, its' second  rededication was held on September 13, 2015, and President Henry B. Eyring officiated at that event.

The Saints in Mexico saw their second temple built in the Colonial Juarez Chihuahua area, becoming the 55th operating temple of the Church.It was dedicated more than 15 years after Mexico City. The dedication of that temple was held on March 6-7, 1999 and President Hinckley presided at that dedication as Church President.

Less than a year later, Mexico's third and fourth temples were dedicated on consecutive days, the Ciudad Juarez Temple on February 26, 2000, and the Hermosillo Sonora Temple on February 27, 2000. They became the 71st and 72nd operating temples of the Church. The remarkable thing to me is that President Hinckley presided over both temple dedications. I find that remarkable because the two cities are 465.5 miles apart.

Less than two weeks after those dedications, the fifth and sixth temples were dedicated on consecutive days as well. The Oaxaca Temple was dedicated on March 11, 2000, becoming the 74th operating temple. The following day (March 12), the Tuxtla Guitierrez Temple was dedicated as the 75th operating temple. President James E. Faust, Second Counselor in the First Presidency, dedicated both temples. As with the previous two temples, I find that remarkable as the two cities are 334.8 miles apart.

About two months later, Mexico saw the dedications of its seventh and eighth temples, again on consecutive days. On May 20, 2000, the Tampico Mexico Temple was dedicated as the Church's 83rd operating temple The next day, the Villahermosa Mexico Temple was dedicated, becoming the 84th operating temple. President Thomas S. Monson, President Hinckley's First Counselor, presided at both dedications, Again, I was amazed to find that the two Mexican cities are a substantial distance apart, 580.9 miles, to be exact.

The next Mexican temples were both dedicated just under 6 weeks after that, also back to back, making the ninth and tenth temples in that nation. The Merida Temple was dedicated as the 92nd operating temple on July 8, 2000, and the next day, the 93rd temple was dedicated in Veracruz. President Monson again presided at both. The two are rare examples of times when a temple dedication was held during the traditional July recess for Church leaders.

Less than a year later, on April 29, 2001, the Guadalajara Mexico Temple became the 105th in operation, and the 11th in Mexico. President Hinckley presided at that event. And one day short of a full year after that, the Monterrey Mexico Temple became the 110th in the Church and Mexico's 12th, with President Hinckley presiding over that event.

The most recent  Mexican temple was dedicated in Tijuana  That happened on December 13, 2015, and President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor to President Monson, presided at that event. With that overview of the history of the temples in Mexico, we see that the Church members in Mexico had two temples in 1999, and subsequently saw a 500% increase in the number of temples in operation just over three years later.

I hope this sets the background for what I am looking at in terms of this area's current and future temples. I will be back shortly with a look at the current composition of these 13 temple districts. That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Site Possibilities: Europe East Area

Hello again, everyone! I am continuing my series of posts on potential future temple prospects, and this post will discuss the current and potential future temples in the Europe East Area of the Church. Again, I have no desire whatsoever to cut off or end the discussion of possibilities in previous areas; I very much hope that will continue. But I wanted to open up for discussion my thoughts on this area as well.

The Europe East Area contains the following countries: Armenia, Azerbajan, Belarus, Bulgaria, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. The Church does not yet have a significant presence in Azerbaijan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan.

Additionally, while the members of the Church living in Belarus are very steadfast, the Church has not seen much growth in that region. In Bulgaria, the Church only has one mission, and 9 branches that are administered by that mission. There is only 1 district (comprised of 4 branches) in Estonia. The Church in the Eastern European country of Georgia only has 2 congregations, both branches, and there are also just 2 branches of the Church in Kazakhstan.

The Church's presence is slightly stronger in Latvia, where 5 branches operate. There are also 5 branches in Lithuania, and the Church is strong enough there that those units are organized into the Vilnius Lithuania district. The interesting thing about Vilnius is that Elder Ballard proposed a temple there in May 1993. Obviously, that will not happen until the Church is more established there, but that is something to look forward to perhaps within the next 30-50 years, if not sooner. And finally, Turkey has 1 mission (called the Central Eurasian Mission), and 8 branches.

Having summarized the situation of the countries in this area with a small or nonexistent Church presence, I can now move on to discuss the one temple in the Europe East Area. That is the Kyiv Ukraine Temple, and its district covers the 3 stakes and 16 districts scattered throughout Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, Moldova, and Romania. Since the dedication of the Kyiv Temple in 2010, only 6 districts have been established. That said, the Moscow Russia district was upgraded to a stake in June 2011, and the Saratov Russia district was upgraded to a stake just 2 years ago this month.

With all of that in mind, I wanted to note that, as recently as the beginning of this week, I did not have any potential candidate cities from this area for a future temple. But as I did more research on all of that, I added one very likely possibility to my list: Moscow Russia.

I added that location for a few reasons. First, there are 6 missions in Russia, along with 3 stakes and 9 districts, which further break down into 17 wards and 83 branches. Anywhere the Church has a minimum of 100 congregations (which is the exact number in Russia), there is reason to look at a temple.

Next, with Moscow being located more than twice the 200 mile goal President Monson has set for Church membership worldwide (it is 536.5 miles exactly from Kyiv), Russia qualifies by that metric. But perhaps most significantly, Russia ranks as the 4th of the top ten nations in the world with the strongest Church presence that does not yet have a temple in any phase. For all of these reasons, I think a Moscow temple may be announced very soon.

Having shared these thoughts, I want to hear from you. How did I do? Did I overlook any other possibilities in this area? What are your feelings on Moscow's chances of getting a temple? It's your turn to sound off in the comments below.

That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Site Possibilities, Europe Area--Part Two: Potential Future Temple Locations

Hello again, everyone! I am back with my list of possible future temple sites that may be announced in the near future within the Europe Area. I have four on my radar at the moment, and they are as follows: Praia Cape Verde, Budapest Hungary, Vienna Austria, and Edinburgh Scotland. Let me now detail my reasons for including these locations.

First, I wanted to talk about the potential I see for a temple in Praia Cape Verde. The Saints in Cape Verde currently fall under the Madrid Spain Temple district, and have to travel 2,125 miles to get to it. Once the Lisbon Portugal Temple is dedicated, the Cape Verde Saints will have a journey of 1,861 miles to travel. Even then, that is more than 9 times the distance goal of 200 miles that has been set by President Monson. Additionally, Cape Verde ranks as the 10th of the top 10 nations with the strongest LDS presence that does not have a temple. So I feel a temple there will happen sooner rather than later.

Next, as I have previously mentioned, I was told by a few people that the next European temple would be built in Budapest Hungary. The case for a temple in Cape Verde seemed more compelling, but I think we will see a Hungarian temple sooner rather than later. The Church units in Hungary currently fall under the Freiberg Germany Temple district, and Hungarian Church members currently travel 436.6 miles to get to that temple. So Budapest qualifies for a temple just based on the distance involved in allowing Saints of that nation to worship.

The third temple on my list is Vienna Austria. My wife served her mission there and I hope someday to be able to take her back for a visit. I am more than slightly biased in my choice of this location. The Saints in Austria currently travel a distance of 324.1 miles to get to their assigned temple in Frnakfurt. So again, we have another site that makes sense, at least in that regard.

Finally, I have Edinburgh Scotland as a possibility. When I first put Scotland on my list of future possibilities, I was torn in regards to whether that nation or Ireland might better serve the people in both nations. But my research shows that Scotland is more likely. Scotland currently falls under the Preston England Temple district, and the Scottish Saints have to travel a distance of 185.4 miles to get to their assigned temple. Perhaps that is not as arduous a journey as the Saints in other countries in this area might have, but it seems a bit too close to President Monson's 200 mile goal, so I could see it happen.

There you have it. Hope you enjoyed reading my thoughts on the potential new temples that could be constructed in the Europe Area. Do I have any on this list that might be more unlikely than I think? Have I overlooked any other locations that could use a temple within this area? It is now your turn to "sound off" in the comments below.

That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Site Possibilities: Europe Area, Part One--Current Temples

Hello again, everyone! While I have no desire whatsoever to halt the ongoing discussion of future temple locations in the areas of the Church I have already covered (I actually hope those will continue), I have felt inclined to get the next post in the series up on this blog. If the numbers I'm seeing are any indication, this series of posts has wide interest. The previous posts in this series, even those that have been up less than 48 hours, have double-digit readership already. That means a lot to me.

That said, I want to now turn our attention to the Europe Area. Because there is so much to cover in terms of this area (which, unless I am mistaken, is the second largest in the Church), I am dividing this area into two posts, the first to discuss the current breakdown of nations in this area, and the second to discuss the possibilities for future temples that I see for this area in the near future.

The Church defines the Europe Area as covering a whopping 44 countries or territories, and the Church has a presence in all but two of those, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Vatican City, headquarters of the Catholic Church and the Pope's residence. Because there are that many countries and territories, I will not be covering each one individually. It would just be too time-consuming. What I can and will do is focus on the 13 current temples in that area, and the number of Church units that are covered in each of those temple districts..

That will include the Bern Switzerland, Copenhagen Denmark, Frankfurt Germany, Freiberg Germany, Helsinki Finland, London England, London England, Madrid Spain, Paris France, Preston England, Stockholm Sweden, and The Hague Netherlands Temples. The Lisbon Portugal and Rome Italy Temples are under construction. Let's talk about each of these temple districts.

The Bern Switzerland Temple district covers 19 stakes and 1 district in Italy, Switzerland, France, Albania and the Jerusalem district in Israel. Once the Rome Italy Temple is dedicated (in early 2019), that temple district will likely take in the 10 stakes in Italy, which would leave the Bern temple with 9 stakes and 1 district.

The Copenhagen Denmark Temple district takes in the 2 stakes in Denmark, 1 in Southern Sweden, and the 2 branches in Iceland.And while the Frankfurt Germany Temple is being renovated, ordinance workers from the Hamburg German & Neuminister Germany stakes have been reassigned to this temple. That information is not relevant to the general subject of current temples, but I thought it was an interesting tidbit.

The Frankfurt Germany Temple district is comprised of 16 stakes and 5 districts located in Western Germany, Austria, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Croatia, Cypress, Serbia, and Slovenia, making it another relatively small district. The Freiberg Germany Temple district covers 5 stakes and 7 districts in Eastern Germany, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia, meaning it is also a small district.

The Helsinki Finland Temple district covers 3 stake and 4 districts located in Finland, Northwestern Russia, Estonia, and Lithuania. The London England Temple district takes in 22 stakes and 2 districts located in the regions of Southern England and the English Midlands, Wales, Ireland and Jordan. The Madrid Spain Temple district covers the 23 stakes and 10 districts in Spain, Portugal, and Cape Verde. That district will shrink somewhat in 2019 when the Lisbon Portugal Temple is dedicated.

The Paris France Temple, dedicated last May, Its district covers 7 stakes. The Preston England Temple district covers Northern England and the English Midlands, Scotland, Ireland, and Northern Ireland. The Stockholm Sweden Temple district covers Sweden, Norway and Latvia, and contains 5 stakes and 2 districts that have been organized within those nations.

Finally, the Hague Netherlands Temple serves the 5 stakes located in the Netherlands and Belgium. As you can see from this data, for the most part, because there are so many temples in this area, the temple districts are very small. The main consideration that has led to a new temple being announced and built within this area is proximity, but other factors include the sheer breadth of each of the nations and the arduous distances the saints within that area have had to travel

That said, I do see a few very viable and likely candidate cities for future temples in this area, and I will be detailing those in the next post. That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.


Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Yet Another Estimate Change for Completion of New Temples in 2018

Hello again, everyone! While I may or may not be able to post my thoughts tonight about temple prospects for the next area of the Church (it's the Europe Area, which is another big one, and it will definitely take some work to get that put up, since I will be dividing that into two posts, as I did previously with the Asia Area), there is something more pressing that deserves attention on this blog.

As many of you who follow this blog regularly are no doubt aware, I have tried to bring the latest temple-related developments to you as soon as I am able to do so after I find out about them. In view of that, I wanted to report that the completion estimate for the first two new temples anticipated to be dedicated during 2018.

Both of those temples (the Concepcion Chile and Kinshasa Democratic Republic of the Congo Temples),  which as recently as earlier today were anticipated to be dedicated in mid-to-late 2018, are now only anticipated to be completed in late  So I will need to alter my completion estimates for those events yet again.

Also, if I didn't mention it before, barring anything unexpected, the Barranquilla Colombia Temple is anticipated to be completed for sure prior to the end of 2018, rather than in early 2019. Also, the Frankfurt Germany Temple is still anticipated to be rededicated in mid-to-late 2018.

Based on this new information, I now believe that the sequence of temple-related events in 2018 could occur as follows:

January: Raleigh North Carolina Temple Renovation Closure (already announced; confirmation of exact date pending)
February: Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple Renovation Closure (already announced; confirmation of exact date pending)
February 19: Oakland California Temple Renovation Closure (date confirmed)
March 4: Washington D. C. Temple Renovation Closure (date confirmed)
May: Mesa Arizona Temple Renovation Closure (date confirmed)
May 20: Jordan River Utah Temple Rededication (confirmed by official announcement)
August 12 or 19: Frankfurt Germany Temple Rededication
October 14 or 21: Concepcion Chile Temple Dedication (161st operating temple)
November 11 or 18: Kinshasa DR Congo Temple Dedication (162nd operating temple)
December 9 or 16: Barranquilla Colombia Temple Dedication (163rd operating temple)

A couple of notes on the dates I ventured above. I did some climate study on the four cities above, and that study shows that August would be the best time for the Frankfurt rededication. . As for the others, these three temples in the southern hemisphere have their spring when fall comes to the northern hemisphere. Because of that, each of these new temples will see the height of their rainy seasons if the dedications occur as suggested above. I also wanted to note that, if these events are pushed back further, that in turn would potentially push back other temple-related events.

For example, until the Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple has full-scale construction begin, we might not know how likely that temple is to be dedicated in early-to-mid 2019. Until I know more, I hope for the best. And with the Oakland California Temple, a rededication is anticipated in late 2019. If that gets pushed back for any reason, then the rededication could take place sometime in 2020. I am also not ruling out the possibility that we could see temples that are progressing more quickly than others pushed ahead in their completion estimate. It has happened before and could easily do so again. Just wanted to mention that, for what it's worth.

That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Update Provided on Construction of the Durban South Africa Temple

Hello again, everyone! I was gratified to check my blog just now and see the many comments that have come in since my last post 12 hours ago. It is obvious that the subject of future temple prospects is a popular one. I will be reading (and, when I feel it is appropriate, responding) to those comments. But first, I wanted to share an exciting update on the Durban South Africa Temple.

According to the information I became aware of about an hour ago,, framing is going up, drywall is being hung, and windwo frames are being fitted. Additionally, bricks are being laid around pillars, and at the missionary housing facility, concrete is being poured for the veranda.

That said, having done the research, I can confirm that this is the third updated status for this temple this month alone. With that in mind, it is almost certain that the Durban temple will be the second one dedicated in 2019, and, as previously noted, I am projecting that might happen in either late May or early June of that year. I am sure that as the next year passes, we will find out more about how reasonable that estimate is, and I will do my best to pass along any adjustments to that as I make them.

That does it for this post. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Site Possibilities: Central America Area

Hello again, everyone! I am back in the early morning hours of November 28 with my next post in the series exploring potential future temple sites. This post will discuss the current temples in the Central America Area and which locations in that area might have a temple announced in the near future. Let's dive right in to that.

The Central America Area of the Church covers the nations of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. There are 6 temples in that area, 2 in Guatemala (Quetzeltenango & Guatemala City), 1 in El Salvador (San Salvador), 1 in Honduras (Tegucigalpa) 1 in Costa Rica (in San Jose), and 1 in Panama City Panama.

Let's get into specifics for each of these countries. Belize has 2 districts (with a total of 12 branches), so it seems unlikely that the Church will build a temple in that nation in the next little while. Costa Rica, in addition to having the aforementioned temple, also has two missions (both of which are headquartered in San Jose). There are also 10 stakes and 23 districts, which are further subdivided into 56 wards and 23 branches, making a grand total of 79 congregations.

Since the dedication of the temple in June 2000, the second mission in that country was established, and 4 of those 10 stakes have been created. Many have seen the case for a second temple there, and I explored two of those at one point. But lately Costa Rica has had a very negative political climate, which does not lend itself to the progress of the Church. It's possible, but not likely, in my opinion, that we will see a second temple in that nation in the near future.

In El Salvador, the three missions are all located in San Salvador, the capital city, although one of them also serves Belize. There are 21 stakes that further break down into 133 wards and 31 branches, for a total of 164 congregations. That nation may be set for now with just the one temple, but if and when I find a good potential candidate for a second one, I will be sure to pass that along.

Next we come to Guatemala, where there are two temples in operation: in Guatemala City and Quetzeltenango. There are six missions of the Church in Guatemala. There are also 48 stakes and 15 districts, which break down further into 285 wards and 156 branches, bringing the total number of Guatemalan congregations to 441.

But what of the current temple districts? The temple in Guatemala City has a district containing 31 stakes and 10 districts.  And Quetzeltenango;s temple district only serves 17 stakes and 7 districts.

In relation to Guatemala, for a while now, I have believed that Guatemala City could get a second temple, based on the precedent set with the second temples in Lima Peru and Manila Philippines. And that could still happen in a big way. But I looked into things further, and a city called Villa Nueva is 3,582 miles from Guatemala City. And while Villa Nueva may be closer to Quetzeltenango (by around 2,00 miles), it is still in the Guatemala City district). Either way, that is around 10 times further than President Monson's goal, so a temple in Villa Nueva makes sense. I could also see the merits of having a second temple in Guatemala City as well.

Now we turn our attention to Honduras. Its only temple is in Tegucigalpa. The nation has four missions (1 in Tegucigalpa, 1 in Comayaguela, and the final two in San Pedro Sula). There are also 31 stakes and 5 districts, which are further divided into 176 wards and 60 branches, making a grand total of 236 congregations, which is a lot for one temple. Many have said that a second temple in San Pedro Sula would be a great idea, and I couldn't agree more. So it is on my list.

Next on the list, I wanted to note that Nicaragua has no temples yet. That nation has two missions, both of which are headquartered in Managua. Nicaraguan members are currently assigned to the Tegucigalpa Honduras Temple district, and to get there, they have to travel a distance of 233.4 miles. That is not much further than the 200 mile goal President Monson set for each member's distance from a temple, but is still far enough to qualify for its own temple.

There are also 12 stakes and 4 districts, which are subdivided into 72 wards and 39 branches, for a total of 111 congregations. As I have previously noted, in 2012, then-Elder Nelson publicly proposed a temple for Managua, and my research indicates land has been held in reserve for that purpose, which means an announcement is only a matter of time. Additionally, Nicaragua ranks #1 of the top ten countries with the most members that does not have a temple in any phase. So it is sure to happen sooner rather than later.

We conclude the discussion of this area by reviewing where the Church is at in Panama. That nation's sole mission is located in Panama City, where the only temple is also located.There are 7 stakes and 4 districts in that nation, which further break down into 45 wards and 28 branches, for a total of 73 congregations. I don't see the Church announcing a second temple in that nation until more units are created.

That does it for this post. Thanks for wading through it. Any comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated, Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Monday, November 27, 2017

Temple Site Possibilities: Brazil Area

Hello again, everyone! In the midst of my series of posts about the potential likelihood temple sites I see in each of the Church's geographical areas, I have only done two such posts in one day one other time, with the Asia Area two days ago. The fact that I am now doing a post to cover the Brazil Area after the previous post covered areas in which I felt no new temples would be announced is significant for me. That said, let's dive right into the discussion of the Brazil Area.

Brazil, as some of you may be aware, consists of 26 states, and within those states, there are 10 temples, 34 missions, 268 stakes and 40 districts, which in turn break down into 1,645 wards and 436 branches, or a grand total of 2,081 congregations. In terms of the 10 temples, let's talk some specifics. As I have thought about it, I have put three potential temples in my predictions for the Brazil area: Salvador, Belo Horizonte, and a potential second temple to serve the Sao Paulo Saints.

The Sao Paulo Temple, dedicated between October 30 and November 2, 1978, covers 45 stakes.Two-thirds of those stakes (30) are located in Sao Paulo. Based on that, I can certainly see why the Church might give those 30 stakes a second temple.

As recently as last year, when I started sharing my thoughts on future temple prospects, if someone had told me that less than two years later, second temples would be announced in Lima Peru and Manila Philippines, I would have dismissed that as impossible. But now that the Church has a precedent of doing so, it seems entirely possible that a second temple could be built to serve the Brazilian Saints in Sao Paulo. So I wanted to mention that possibility. A second temple in Sao Paulo would be the third built to accomodate Saints in that area, following the dedications of the Sao Paulo and Campinas

After that first temple was dedicated in Sao Paulo, it would be more ore than 22 years later before the next temples were dedicated. In 2000, President Hinckley dedicated the Recife Temple on December 15, and dedicated the Porto Alegre Brazil Temple two days after that. So the number of temples more than doubled in roughly a 72 hour period.

The Recife Brazil Temple currently serves 76 stakes and 9 districts, although that number will be cut somewhat when the Fortaleza Brazil Temple is dedicated (which will, barring any unexpected delays, take place in mid-to-late 2019).

If I have my facts straight, then, at minimum, the Fortaleza Temple district will be comprised of stakes in the the Ceara region, and there are 18 stakes there, which would trim down the Recife District to 58 stakes and 9 districts.

The stakes that are anticipated to be covered by the temple in Belem fall under that temple district as well, and, as we know, that temple was announced last year, though it has not had a site announcement or a groundbreaking as of yet. When that temple is dedicated, it will serve the Saints in the Para region, and will, at minimum, include the 6 stakes and 2 districts based in that region, which would then leave Recife with 52 stakes and 7 districts.

In addition to that, another city, Salvador, is the number one candidate I see for the next temple in Brazil. Salvador falls under the Bahia region, which contains 10 stakes and 2 districts. A temple there would trim the Recife district down to a a still respectable 42 stakes and 5 districts.

Turning our attention now to the Porrto Alegre Brazil Temple, it  serves 25 stakes and 8 districts. None of the temples currently under construction or announced fall under that temple district. Some may be theorizing that a second temple could be built in that region of Brazil, but I don't see a compelling enough case supporting that idea.

Less than two years following the dedications of their second and third temples, the Brazilian Saints celebrated the May 2002 dedication of the temple in Campinas. That temple district has a total of 80 stakes and 19 districts. Once the Rio de Janeiro Temple, currently under construction, is dedicated (which is anticipated to include, at minimum, the 15 stakes and 2 districts in that region of Brazil, that will leave the Campinas district with 65 stakes and 17 districts.

That district will further be trimmed down once the Brasilia Brazil Temple is dedicated. That temple will, at minimum serve 5 stakes and 1 district located in the Distrito Federal region of Brazil, which would then leave the Campinas Temple district with 60 stakes and 16 districts.

But that district could be trimmed even more if, as I am projecting, a temple is announced for Belo Horizonte Brazil. Falling under the Minas Gerais region of Brazil, a temple in Belo Horizonte would take in the 13 stakes and 6 districts within that region, which would then leave the Campinas temple district with 47 stakes and 10 districts.

The Saints in Brazil had to wait 6.5 year wait before the next temple was dedicated, this one in Curitiba. That district contains 28 stakes and 3 districts, so it seems small enough that it will not split, at least not anytime soon.

Then in June 2012, Brazilians celebrated the dedication of the temple in Manaus. That temple district covers 13 stakes and 1 district currently, so I don't see any other temples being announced to split that district, at least not for the foreseeable future.

With all of this in mind, I hope it is apparent why I favor Salvador and Belo Horizonte, and why I have thought and felt that there could easily be an argument in favor of a second temple in Sao Paulo.

That said, are there any locations I did not consider, or are there any that should be eliminated? I look forward to the discussion. That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.