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Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Miscellaneous Church and Temple News

Hello again, everyone! I am posting again now to pass along miscellaneous Church and temple news. First, regarding temples, I wanted to report that the LDS Church Temples site, which had a massive data loss earlier this year, continues its' restoration process. The updated estimate for when the site might be up and running again is now listed for September. As we continue to unite our prayers in behalf of all of those working on this issue, hopefully it will again be available sooner rather than later.

Next, the updates from the Church News. This article reports on the sacrifices made by Saints in Brazil to reach the first temple in that nation (which was located in Sao Paulo), and talks about how temples have since started dotting that nation. With 6 in operation, 2 under construction, and 2 others announced, and other potential locations have become a real possibility.

I currently have 4 Brazilian candidates on my list for the near future, namely: Belo Horizonte, Salvador, Florianopolis, and a second in the Sao Paulo area).  Thanks to the increase in the number of temples in that nation, hose Saints no longer have to make great sacrifices to attend the temple., and the first South American apostle, Elder Ulisses Soares, comes from Brazil.

As I have previously observed, the Lord seems to be mindful of Brazil, and of how valuable that nation has been in increasing the strength of the Church worldwide in many ways. I am sure we will certainly see many other Brazilian temples announced in the not-too-distant future, and that we might even see a day when the number of temples operating in Brazil matches or exceeds the number of temples in Utah. It will be interesting to see in what manner and how swiftly all of that unfolds.

Salt Lake City, where the Church's worldwide headquarters is located, is home to many "hidden jewels and gems" which are popular attractions for those who are visiting the city, whether for General Conference, the Lights on Temple Square during the Christmas season, or at other times. This article describes some of the most frequently-visited locations which fit that description.

And finally, the Church News again reported on "Mormon Night with the Angels", which is a Monday night each July in which members and friends of the LDS Church are given a special opportunity to attend a baseball game for the Los Angeles Angels. The team gives an invitation for  the Church to have one of its' leaders throw out the ceremonial first pitch. This year, Elder Ronald A. Rasband of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles had that honor, which  you can read more about here.

I continue to monitor all temple and Church news and will do my level best to bring word of those to you ASAP after I become aware of these developments. That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to stay informed of newly-added content, please feel free to subscribe. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.


Monday, July 30, 2018

Two Additional Church News Stories Reported

Hello again, everyone! I am back yet again, this time to cover two additional Church news stories which have been published within the last 10 hours or less. The Church News again continues to highlight landmark and significant addresses from Church leaders in their "From the Vault" Series. The focus of this week's article was on an address given by then-Elder Gordon B. Hinckley of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in October 1974 on the campus of BYU-Provo. Although President Hinckley's foremost legacy was his smaller temple-building program, which more than doubled the number of temples in the period of a few short years, he was also well-known as an eternal optimist.

In his aforementioned address, he spoke about how important optimism can be in our daily lives. He also talked about how being pessimistic, especially about things that are outside our ability to control, can dampen our spirits and weigh us down. By focusing on the positive (which does not necessarily mean ignoring the negative, bur rather not letting the good in our lives be outweighed by the bad, difficult, or challenging things), our lives take on a richer quality, and we are better equipped to deal with the hard times when they come. Both the summary of his address and the address itself are well worthy of your time.

The second and final new item I wanted to report on was how two "native sons of St. George", Elders Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and Steven E. Snow, Church Historian and Recorder, who is a General Authority Seventy, traveled "back home" to St. George this weekend for the rededication of the St. George Tabernacle. Also in attendance was Bishop Dean M. Davies, First Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric, who had a supervisory role in the tabernacle's renovation process. The Church News summary can find found here, with a more complete summary provided by the Deseret News here.

I continue to monitor all Church news and temple developments and will do my level best to bring word of those to you as I receive them. That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to do so, please feel free to subscribe to stay informed of new content. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Temple Updates Provided

Hello again, everyone! On this second-to-last day of July, I am pleased to post today to share some updates of which I have become aware in terms of temple developments. Let's get right into it. First, I have mentioned that, especially in view of President Nelson's reportedly extensive plans to expand the number of temples in a short period of time, there seems to be every likelihood that the Church will have at least 200 temples in operation by the 200th anniversary of the Church's reestablishment (which, as I have noted, will occur on Saturday April 6, 2030). With 30 temples in various phases, the Church would just need to complete each of those, and announce and complete 11 others in the 11.68 years between today and that date, which could be done if 3.51 temples were dedicated per year during that time.

As I also mentioned, although only 2 temple dedications will be held this year, there is already 1 temple dedication set for next year, and there are 5 other temples that will almost certainly be dedicated in 2019 as well. And with the 3 others under construction that are currently anticipated to be dedicated within the first 6-8 months of 2020, there will be 170 operating temples by around this time in 2020, by which time several other temples will likely have had a groundbreaking and could be close to dedication as well.

If there are a minimum of 170 temples dedicated by July 30, 2020, that would leave the Church 9 years, 8 months, and 7 days (9.68 decimal years) in which to build and dedicate those 30, which would then lower the number of temples that would need to be dedicated per year to 3.1. And if the initial word on President Nelson's temple-building plans is any indication whatsoever, that will be easy for the Church to do.

That said, let's briefly talk about the temple updates which I have found out about. We start with the Concepcion Chile Temple, where a new series of photographs have been posted on the LDS Church Temples Facebook page. It is good to see the progress on that temple, since its' open house begins in around 6.5 weeks.

We turn now to the Kinshasa DR Congo Temple, where the installation of walkways around temple grounds continues. As we are nearing the end of the typical July recess month for the apostles, I would anticipate that a dedication announcement could be made within the next 2-3 months, but perhaps sooner. It will be interesting to see how that unfolds, and whether or not that temple's dedication could be set to occur prior to the already-scheduled dedication of the Rome Italy Temple.

Next, I wanted to mention that I was able to find an update of sorts on the construction process for the Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple. I am not entirely sure how reliable the information in this video is, but someone posted what appears to be an update showing progress on this temple through Youtube. If any of you have any information on whether or not the updates in this video are valid, let me know.

A new video and photograph series has been posted on the LDS Church Temples Facebook page, which you can find at the link below. We at long last have an update for the Rio de Janerio Temple, which shows that exterior cladding is underway. Additionally, an article from a local paper about that temple was shared on Facebook earlier today, all of which you can find out more about on the aforementioned Facebook page.

We have yet another update on the Winnipeg Manitoba  Temple, where plies have been installed for the meetinghouse, and where preparation is underway to pour the foundation for that meetinghouse. As I mentioned previously, it is likely that the Church has more imminent need of the meetinghouse while the temple continues its' construction. I will pass along more as I learn of it.

And finally, some of you may have seen a recent comment on this blog from someone living close to the Raleigh North Carolina Temple. According to the information he provided in the comment, exterior framing and sheathing is now complete, weatherproofing has been attached to the temple's exterior, metal supports for stone attachment are being added around the exterior, and waterproofing is underway for the temple's newly-completed tower.

Before ending as I always do, I wanted to note that, while these updates are an encouraging sign, I do not see anything in the new information which would indicate a change is needed on any of the estimates I have previously offered. Stay tuned for more as I hear of it. I continue to monitor all such developments and will do my level best to pass those updates along as I learn of them.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here, please feel free to subscribe to stay informed of newly-added content. Thank you for the privilege of your time. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Sunday, July 29, 2018

Church Issues Statement on Youth Interviews

Hello again, everyone! As some of you may know, an LDS man by the name of Sam Young recently reportedly launched a "hunger strike" that was effective today to protest the ongoing problems he sees in the way the Church approaches interviews with the youth. KUTV published this story about that hunger strike.

In response to the concerns raised by Sam Young, and having been given a request for comment, Church leadership issued this statement which directly responds to the reason behind the hunger strike, and outlines how local and general Church leadership have responded to the concerns raised by Sam Young.

If I may offer a comment here, while I appreciate Brother Young's expressed concerns, and while I feel the Church's response was appropriate, I disagree that a hunger strike is the best way to go about getting ones' concerns properly resolved. The Church has taken action in recent months to tweak the procedures by which youth and children are interviewed. But this kind of protest, in my opinion, which seems to be attempting to force the Church to take it more seriously, is just as much of an inappropriate response to such concerns as was the vocal protest of the woman during the April 2018 Sustaining of Church Officers who was quoted as yelling repeatedly: "Stop protecting sexual predators."

In the midst of the increasing official statements and policy changes the Church has undertaken to deal with such concerns in the 6.5 months of President Nelson's prophetic administration thus far, it is mind-boggling to me that individuals such as Brother Young and the woman who yelled during General Conference are choosing that approach rather than giving a more careful reading to the material the Church has released on that subject.

If they had bothered to do so, then they would know that Church leaders have been increasingly more concerned about such matters, and have issued statements and materials which are meant to stop such issues before they become a problem. Among those statements that have been issued is a reiteration of the Church's zero-tolerance policy for abuse of any kind from those in a position of trust, who are promptly removed from their positions and are subject to Church disciplinary measures as soon as their conduct is discovered and proven beyond reasonable doubt.

That said, it is important to note that, if such issues are truly concerning to members of the Church anywhere in the world, there is a proper and appropriate way, including going through the correct channels, to get such concerns resolved. And in my opinion, that has not happened in this case. I am grateful to the leaders of the Church for their prompt and measured response, but getting these issues resolved in the way the Lord has prescribed is a lot more effective than taking such drastic measures as a hunger strike or as shouting about the issue in the middle of General Conference.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to stay informed of new content, please feel free to subscribe. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Additional Church News Reported

Hello again, everyone! There have been several significant articles reported in the various Church news outlets, which I finally am able to pass along to you all today. So let's get right into it. First of all, as some of you may know, before Sister Wendy Nelson married then-Elder Nelson, she was a professor at BYU-Provo. As such, she had at least one opportunity to speak at a BYU Devotional. This article summarizes her remarks from a 1998 devotional about how it is always possible for any of us to change. It is a remarkable address, and the article summarizing it is well worthy of your attention.

At the BYU-Idaho commencement, Brother Douglas D. Holmes, First Counselor in the Young Men General Presidency, offered 3 suggestions regarding how graduates could put their trust in God. This summary of his remarks is well worth your attention as well.

A few days later than I hoped or planned, I am finally providing a summary of the "Days of '47" KSL Parade. The theme for this year was "Foundations for the Future". As mentioned previously, President M. Russell Ballard, Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, who has pioneer ancestry, served as Grand Marshal for the parade. You can read more about the parade here/

There was a bit of local outcry from the LGBTQ community about the application for the participation of their group being denied, but that was primarily due to the fact that the parade is meant to honor and highlight pioneer heritage, while that community seemed to be wanting to participate to advance their own agenda.

As I may have mentioned a few times previously on this blog, it has been traditional for each Pioneer Day to commence with a Sunrise Service that has featured an address from a general Church leader. This year, that address was given by Elder Mervyn B. Arnold of the Seventy, who also has pioneers in his ancestry. As I also previously mentioned, Elder Arnold, who had his 70th birthday earlier this month, is one of those I am anticipating will be released and granted emeritus status in October, so this may have been his last public address as a General Authority. You can read more about what he said here.

I will be providing only brief summaries of the next few articles. Mexico City recently held an education fair which supported Church values, and about which you can read more here. The Church News also continued (and may have finished) its' series of articles about new Church leaders with this one about Lisa L. Harkness, who was sustained last April as the new First Counselor in the Primary General Presidency.

The Church News also provided more details regarding the video series in which Sister Reyna I. Aburto, Second Counselor in the Relief Society General Presidency, opened up and shared some details about hardships she has experienced that have strengthened her faith. This next article was of interest to me due to my dad's connections to St. George, and I believe some of you have mentioned your connections to that city as well. With the Tabernacle in that city having recently concluded a renovation process, Elder Holland returned to his hometown to rededicate it, and you can find more details on both the renovation and rededication here.

More news regarding Elder Holland. I reported earlier this month that he had gone to England at the invitation of Baroness Emma Nicholson to address an AMAR gathering. When the Baroness was in Salt Lake recently, she met with Elder Holland, President Nelson, and Sister Sharon Eubank, First Counselor in the Relief Society General Presidency. You can read more about that meeting here.

In yet another report from the Seminar for New Mission Leadership, this article features highlights from the closing address given by Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf, who, as previously noted, chairs the Church Missionary Executive Council. In his address, the former airline pilot took his aviation references to new heights (pun intended).

After the horrific meetinghouse shooting in Fallon Nevada last week, that community has seen an increased outpouring in expressions of love and support from various outlets, which you can read more about here. In an article that is part of their "History Revisited" series, the Church News commemorated 20 years since President Hinckley dedicated the first of his inspired "smaller temples" with this article, which highlights why that plan was a game-changer. As we enter an era where an additional "game-changing" temple building plan may be initiated, it was good to be reminded of what occurred under President Hinckley's leadership.

More research from a study done at BYU found the truth of the idea that the family that prays together stays together. This article highlights the results of that study, and offers six reasons why family prayer is important.

The Church News also continued their series titled "This Week on Social" with this article sharing comments on remembering the sacrifice of pioneers, how to define real faith, and the importance of ministering. Those comments came from President M. Russell Ballard and Elders Quentin L. Cook, Neil L. Andersen, and Ulisses Soares.

Rounding out my coverage of these articles is this one about a Pakistani refugee who has undertaken an ambitious service project at an African-American cemetery in Houston, this one summarizing 7 quotes from female Church leaders on how to make better choices and decisions, and this one which shares how Catholic priests and nuns recent helped a man to find his Italian ancestors.

I continue to monitor all Church and temple news and will do my level best to bring you word of those developments as I become aware of them. That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to do so, please feel free to subscribe to stay informed of new content. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Update Provided on the Renovation Process for the Mesa Arizona Temple

Hello again, everyone! The LDS Church Temples Facebook page has provided another update on the Mesa Arizona Temple's renovation process. As demolition on the ground continues, the parking lot on the northwest side and the west reflecting pool have been removed. The retaining wall and the entrance stairs are being removed around three sides of the temple as well, although there is no indication as to what is occurring on the fourth (east) side of the temple, since the Arizona heat prevented the individual posting that update from inspecting that .area.

It is good to see the small but still significant progress that is being made on temples everywhere. In addition to studying future temple sites, my ongoing evaluation of the timing within which each temple event might occur in the future continues. I will do my level best to keep bringing such updates to you all as I become aware of them.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to do so, please feel free to subscribe to stay informed of newly-added content. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Revised List of Additional Temple Prospects That Could Potentially Be Announced Next October

Hello again, everyone! There have been several additional Church news stories shared within the last 48 hours which I hope to share with you all. Stay tuned for that  update, because I am posting n again right now for an entirely different reason. Over the last 3-5 hours, I have taken time to revisit the list I have assembled of additional temple prospects that could have an announcement during General Conference in just over two months.

As many of you may recall, on July 10 of this year, I had shared a list of additional temple prospects which I was considering adding to my main list of those locations that could have a temple announced next October. In the 15 days since that post, I have periodically looked into both those locations that were suggested to me, and also some other locations which may, for various reasons, be prime candidates for a temple.

I also looked extensively at the feedback that has come in from you, my readers, in that regard. And based on that, I expanded my list quite a bit (including moving some candidates on the other two lists I have been keeping of less imminently likely locations and also long-shot prospects onto this list.

Based on the additional feedback which may be provided on this altered list, I can then look more deeply into which of these locations should be added to the main list for October, which would include adding the relevant notes about such locations to my predictions for the upcoming General Conference.

The main unknowns about any potential temple prospects are, of course, to what extent the temple-building legacy of President Nelson will expand the number of temples, how frequently we might see temples announced, the number of temples that could be identified each time there are new ones announced, whether President Nelson's plan involves a smaller-scale design that will still be serviceable, and the speed at which the current and potential future backlog of temples announced and under construction can continued to be cleared.

As I noted in other posts, by mid-2020, all temples currently under construction (from Concepcion Chile to Winnipeg Manitoba) will be dedicated. By that time, hopefully at least 12 others might also be under construction,. It will certainly be interesting to see what happens between now and then. I will continue to monitor all such developments and will do my level best to bring those to you as I receive word of them.

The updated list of locations I am currently determining whether or not to add to my main list of those that could potentially be announced in October follows below. Most notably, while previous lists did not include candidates for the next temples in Canada and California, this version includes 2 Canadian and 1 Californian prospect. 

One thing that might potentially affect the current and future temples of the Church in California is whether or not that state ever successfully splits into 2 or more smaller states. I have been reading more lately about a venture capitalist that has tried and failed at least twice to split that state into several smaller ones.

The most recent proposal to do so got enough signatures to appear on the ballot for the November 2018 General Elections, but apparently the Supreme Court of the State of California pulled the measure from the ballot to allow more study on the proposition. So for now, that is essentially a dead initiative, but if California (or other states) wind up splitting, or if the US admits any other states into the Union, the temples in such regions could potentially be renamed, which, insofar as I have been able to ascertain, has never occurred.

That said, the updated version of the list follows below. Please feel free to let me know whether I need to eliminate any of these locations, replace them with more likely prospects, or have overlooked any other feasible options for the near future. Again, this is not meant to be an exhaustive list to cover all possibilities that ever may get a temple. This list focuses only on those prospects which I should specifically add to the other locations for my October 2018 General Conference. Your comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated.

So as not to disturb the flow of that information, I will end here now as I traditionally do. That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to stay informed of newly-added content, please feel free to subscribe. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

List of additional potential locations that may get a temple in the near future:
Africa Southeast: Kampala Uganda; Maputo Mozambique; Lubumbashi DR Congo; Cape Town South Africa
Africa West: Monrovia Liberia; Yamoussoukro Ivory Coast
Asia: Ulaanbaatar Mongolia; Taichung Taiwan
Asia North: Osaka Japan
Brazil: Rio Grande Brazil; Florianopolis Brazil; Alphaville Brazil (or a second in Sao Paulo)
Europe: Edinburgh Scotland; Vienna Austria
Idaho: Preston Idaho
Mexico: Queretaro Mexico
North America Central: Wichita Kansas; Lethbridge Alberta; Green Bay Wisconsin; Des Moines Iowa
North America Northeast: Augusta Maine; Hamilton Ontario; Morristown/East Brunswick New Jersey; Concord New Hampshire; Montpelier Vermont
North America Southeast: Jacksonville Florida; Knoxville Tennessee
North America West: Bakersfield California
Pacific: Tarawa Kiribati; Pago Pago American Samoa; Savai'i Samoa; Neiafu Vava'u Tonga
Philippines: Davao Philippines
South America Northwest: Maracaibo Venezuela; Iquitos Peru; Cali/Medellin Colombia
South America South: Antofagasta/Valparaiso Chile; Neuquen Argentina

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Multiple Updates Provided on Temples Worldwide

Hello again, everyone! On this Pioneer Day in which we are looking forward to a new pioneering effort in terms of the temple-building program of the Church, I am please to be able to bring you several temple updates which have been reported within the last 12 hours or less.

Most notably, it has been confirmed that the Hamilton New Zealand Temple has officially closed for its' renovation process, which, as noted, is anticipated to last until sometime during 2021. It is also worth noting that while we know some general elements of the renovation plans for that temple, the more specific details are either pending official confirmation or unknown to all but those who are privy to such discussions. I would also refer you to an earlier discussion on the threads of this blog, in which a comment noted some elements of that plan.

It is also worth noting that I have reevaluated my general and more-specific estimates for future temple events, which has involved, among other elements, moving the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple, which has seen consistent progress, above the Raleigh North Carolina Temple, which has progressed less consistently, although Raleigh did close 3 weeks prior to Baton Rouge.

I additionally have removed any estimate related to the rededication of the Asuncion Paraguay Temple. Unless and until we hear that renovation efforts have fully begun, it will be next to impossible to determine its' likely completion estimate. One thing is certain, however: unless that full-scale process begins in the next month or two, there will likely be no chance that that temple will be rededicated before the end of next year. I know that the First Presidency had announced it would be rededicated next year, but since almost a year has passed with no progress reported, I don't see that happening.

That said, in view of the sheer volume of updated content I need to share here, it has seemed wiser to me to post the latest version of my temple construction progress report in full. The updated information I am providing is included in red text as always. In order to not disturb the flow of that report, I will end here as I always do.

That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here, please feel free to subscribe to stay informed of newly-added content. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.


Temple Construction Progress (current as of 7/24/18)

Note about future temple construction: I have previously referenced the statement made by Elder Larry Y. Wilson, who serves as the Temple Department Executive Director, to the effect that 80 temples were on a list of locations that would be considered for an official announcement within the 15 years following that statement. And although we may not know whether or not those 80 locations have been announced by late April 2032, it seems reasonable to believe that the Church could (and likely will) have 200 operating temples by or before Saturday April 6, 2030 (which will mark the Church’s bicentennial anniversary). In order to do so, the Church would just need to complete the 30 temples in various phases, and announce and complete 11 others in the 11.70 years between now and then, which could be done if 3.50 temples are dedicated each year. Although this year will see only 2 temple dedications, there are 5 or 6 anticipated in 2019, and at least 3 that we know of so far the following year. So I am confident the Church will have at least 200 in operation by that time, whether or not an official goal is made to do so.
                        
Current temple status: The Church has 189 temples in various phases. There are 159 in operation, with 3 others that have a dedication scheduled, and an additional 8 that are in various phases of construction. In terms of temples undergoing renovations, 10 temples are currently closed for renovation (5 or 6 of which are anticipated to be rededicated next year), and 1 other, which closed for renovation in late 2017, is currently stalled in its’ renovation process. The remaining 19 are announced, with at least 2 that are anticipated to have a groundbreaking by the end of 2018, while several others are likely to have a groundbreaking in 2019 and the years following that.

Dedication Scheduled:                                                                                         
160. Concepcion Chile Temple: New temple photographs (including one of the completed cupola) posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018; dedication scheduled to occur on Sunday October 28, 2018.
161.  Barranquilla Colombia Temple: New photograph posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018 show flowers in bloom; dedication scheduled to occur on Sunday December 9, 2018.
162. Rome Italy Temple: Sod laying completed, as shown through a video posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018; dedication scheduled to occur from Sunday March 10-Sunday March 17, 2019.

Under construction, completion estimated during 2019:
163. Kinshasa Democratic Republic of the Congo Temple: More plants added to temple grounds; completion estimated sometime during early-to-mid 2019.
Note: Having recently been reminded that this temple (for the moment, at least) will not include an angel Moroni statue, it is my feeling that we could see a dedication held in mid-April, unless it is scheduled to occur prior to the already-scheduled dedication of the Rome Italy Temple.
164. Fortaleza Brazil Temple: New aerial photographs posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018; completion estimated sometime during early-to-mid 2019.
Note: Given the recent massive number of updates which we have seen provided for this temple, as long as it continues to steadily progress towards its’ completion, a rededication could be set for mid-to-late May, following Mother’s Day.
165. Port-au-Prince Haiti Temple: Completion estimated sometime during mid-2019.
Note: Although I have not found any updates for this temple in the recent past, if it has progressed at a steady rate, the dedication could be held for it in early-to-mid June. If I see information that leads me to conclude that will happen sooner, I will alter this estimate.
166. Lisbon Portugal Temple: Panoramic pictures posted to Facebook on July 21, 2018; completion estimated sometime during mid-2019.
Note: Given the recent massive number of developments reported for this temple on the LDS Church Temples page, if construction continues at a steady rate, this temple could potentially be dedicated in mid-to-late August. I will alter this estimate as needed once more information is available.
167. Durban South Africa Temple: Work progressing on temple tower; completion estimated sometime during mid-to-late 2019.
Note: As previously mentioned, on July 19, 2019, the Church News identified the first president for this temple. Since we have not yet heard about the first presidents for the Fortaleza, Port-au-Prince, or Lisbon temples, there may be a possibility that this temple could be dedicated sooner than many (myself included) have anticipated. Until more is known in that regard, I am adjusting my previously-offered estimate to mid-October.

Temples estimated to be completed sometime during 2020:
168. Arequipa Peru Temple: New picture posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018 shows snow-capped mountains in the background; completion estimated sometime during early 2020.
Note: While this temple and the temples in Rio de Janeiro and Winnipeg may, in some ways, be interchangeable in terms of their future likely completion order, since this one seems to remain ahead for the moment, it could be dedicated sometime between January and March, but perhaps earlier, if progress continues at a steady rate.
169. Rio de Janeiro Brazil Temple: Completion estimated sometime during early 2020.
Note: While I have not found a recent update on this temple, if progress has continued steadily, a dedication could potentially occur between February and April, but certainly earlier depending on what is reported between now and then.
170. Winnipeg Manitoba Temple: Additional pictures shared on Facebook on July 23, 2018; completion estimated sometime during early-to-mid 2020.
Note: Since there has been no change to the 20-month estimate in which this temple is anticipated to be completed, full-scale construction could conclude in February or March, in which case a dedication could follow between April and June. I will be keeping my eyes open for anything that would necessitate a change in that estimate.

Undergoing Renovation (rededication estimated sometime during 2019):
41. Frankfurt Germany Temple: Closed for renovation; updated photograph posted to Facebook on July 24, 2018; completion estimated sometime during early-to-mid 2019.
Note: Given the update noted above, I stand by my estimate that this temple could either be rededicated in February (prior to the already-scheduled dedication of the Rome Italy Temple) or in mid-to-late April. As more is known, if I need to adjust my thinking on this estimate, I will do so.
95. Oklahoma City Oklahoma Temple: Update provided on July 7, 2018; rededication estimated sometime during mid-2019.
Note: If the article about this temple’s renovation process, which was posted on the LDS Church Temples Facebook site on the date noted above, is any indication, then renovation efforts will conclude in April or May, which means that a rededication could potentially occur in either June or early-to-mid August, following the annual July recess for the General Authorities.
80. Memphis Tennessee Temple: Closed for renovation; photograph posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018 shows progress on tower cladding; rededication estimated sometime during mid-2019.
Note: Although this temple has not progressed as consistently as the Oklahoma City Oklahoma Temple, it has continued at a steady pace. With that in mind, this temple could be rededicated in mid-September.
94. Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple: Closed for renovation; photograph posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018 shows reshaped exterior of temple; rededication estimated sometime during mid-to-late 2019.
Note: Given the recent steady progress made on this temple, and the comparatively less progress we have seen reported for the Raleigh North Carolina Temple, I am making a bold new prediction that this temple will be rededicated before that one, and that this could occur in mid-to-late October.
68. Raleigh North Carolina Temple: Closed for renovation; applying vapor barrier to exterior; rededication estimated sometime during mid-to-late 2019.
Note: Given the lack of a report showing that this temple is making steady progress in its’ renovation, and the relatively more substantial progress that has been noted on the Baton Rouge Louisiana Temple, as noted above, I moved this one down on July 24, 2018. That said, this temple could be rededicated in either mid-November or mid-December, assuming all goes well.


Undergoing Renovation (rededication estimated sometime during late 2019-early 2020)
13. Oakland California Temple: Closed for renovation; temple exterior being refreshed; rededication estimated sometime during late 2019-early 2020.
Note: As I have previously noted, this temple is older, and is having its’ first renovation. With that in mind, depending on how consistently we hear updates on its’ progress, a rededication could occur anytime during December 2019-March or April 2020.

Undergoing Renovation (rededication estimated sometime during 2020):
18. Tokyo Japan Temple: Closed for renovation; construction of new annex building and interior renovations are underway; rededication estimated sometime during early-to-mid 2020.
Note: If this temple continues to make consistent progress, then we could see a rededication occur sometime during April-June, though that may be pushed back to August if delays occur.
7. Mesa Arizona Temple: Closed for renovation; time-lapse video of Visitor’s Center razing posted on Facebook on July 24, 2018; rededication may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2020.
Note: On May 10, 2018, the Church released details of the renovation plans for this temple. Exactly three weeks later, the Church released additional details of plans to redevelop the area around the temple. Bearing in mind that this temple has been renovated before, and that it is a somewhat older and larger temple, its’ rededication could occur sometime between mid-August and late September.
16. Washington D. C. Temple: Closed for renovation; picture update posted to Facebook on July 5, 2018; rededication may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2020.
Note: Since this is an older and larger temple undergoing its’ first renovation, a rededication could take place sometime between early October and mid-December. Once more is known about this temple’s progress (or the lack thereof), I will provide any adjustments to this estimate that may be needed.

Undergoing Renovation (rededication estimated sometime during 2021):
11. Hamilton New Zealand Temple: Closed for renovation; rededication may take place sometime during early-to-mid 2021.
Note: On July 24, 2018, the LDS Church Temples Facebook page confirmed that this temple had closed for renovation. While the extent of the renovation plans currently remain unknown (or at least uncertain), the temple may be subject to a complete exterior and interior overhaul, which may involve an expansion. Unless something occurs that delays this process, this temple could potentially be dedicated in mid-to-late April 2021. As more is known, any adjustments that are needed in terms of this estimate will be made.

Renovation process stalled; full-scale work pending:
112. Asuncion Paraguay Temple: Closed for renovation; full-scale renovation pending.
Note: Until formal renovation efforts are underway for this temple, it will be difficult (if not impossible) to pinpoint both a general and more specific completion estimate. Consequently, on July 24, 2018, I removed any estimates from this temple. If I hear renovation efforts are underway in the near future, I will then again add a general completion estimate, and offer a more specific estimate as well. Either way, it does not appear likely at this point that this temple will be rededicated in 2019, as was originally announced.

Note on announced temples: Although I have previously indicated that I was no longer comfortable or confident enough to venture general or even more specific time-frames for the groundbreakings of these temples, recent developments have made it easier to surmise how soon such events might happen, so, on May 31, 2018, I again added those estimates. As part of that process, I have once again altered, where new information necessitated, the order in which these temples are listed. That said, the timing of such events has always been up to the Lord, who reveals His will in that regard to His prophets. Whether or not the groundbreakings occur within the windows indicated here, I will embrace those whenever they actually take place.

Announced temples:
171. Bangkok Thailand Temple: Planning and approvals; artist’s rendering released on March 19, 2018; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2018.
Note: With the site identified and the release of the artist’s rendering, a groundbreaking for this temple may just be a matter of time. And since this November marks the 52nd anniversary of Thailand’s being dedicated for the preaching of the gospel, November may just be the month in which this groundbreaking occurs.
172. Urdaneta Philippines Temple: Site clearing activities underway; artist’s rendering anticipated to be released in the near future; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2018.
Note: On July 6, 2018, the LDS Church Temples Facebook page reported the developments noted above, and with that in mind, an artist’s rendering may be released and a groundbreaking ceremony may be set at some point in the very near future. What is unclear for the moment is how soon that might occur. While I would anticipate that the Bangkok Thailand Temple, which is further along in the process for now, might have a groundbreaking first, I am certain a groundbreaking ceremony will be held for this temple by the end of this year. As more is known, I will be able to offer a more precise estimate.
173. Saratoga Springs Utah Temple: Planning and approval; designs underway; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during late 2018-early 2019.
Note: Although a site confirmation is pending for this temple, because designs are currently underway, and because this is a Utah County temple (since temples in Utah always progress more swiftly than other temples elsewhere within the US), on May 31, 2018, I moved this temple up on this list. Then, on July 6, 2018, as a result of the developments relating to the Urdaneta Philippines temple, I moved this one down and adjusted my general estimate for its’ groundbreaking. I am not ruling out the prospect that the Church could hold a groundbreaking for this temple before the end of 2018, so if I feel a need to move this temple again in the near future, I will do so.
174. Lima Peru Los Olivos Temple: Planning and preliminary construction phase; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during early 2019.
Note: In March 2017, the contractor for this temple indicated that a year of pre-planning would be needed for this temple site before a groundbreaking could be held. While it is unclear when that year began (or if that year has already passed), it seems safe to assume that the groundbreaking for this temple could occur within the next year, if not sooner.
175. Pocatello Idaho Temple: Planning and approval; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during early-to-mid 2019.
Note: Although the citizens of Pocatello have speculated about two or more potential locations for this temple, one of those locations has emerged as being the most likely prospect. If the Church confirms that at any point in the near future, since this temple is going to be built within the “Mormon corridor”, a groundbreaking could occur sooner rather than later.
176. Harare Zimbabwe Temple: Planning and approval; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-2019.
Note: Although an official site confirmation is pending, President Nelson visited a probable location during his world tour in April 2018. If that site location is officially confirmed in the near future, then a groundbreaking could easily follow within the next 15 months or less.
177. Nairobi Kenya Temple: Planning and approval; awaiting official site announcement; media event held June 14, 2017; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-2019.
Note: During President Nelson’s recent visit to Kenya, a national newspaper noted that the site for this temple had been selected, and that because this temple was anticipated to be a smaller one, its’ dedication might occur sometime during 2021. With that in mind, it is not hard to believe that an official site announcement and groundbreaking could occur within the next 15-18 months.
178. Brasilia Brazil Temple: Planning and approval; site inspected by Church engineers on June 21, 2017; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2019.
Note: Although a site inspection occurred one year ago for this temple, the prospective groundbreaking timeframes offered for the temples above necessitates a change in my previously-offered thoughts about the imminence of that groundbreaking. While I would hope that the Brazilian Saints would not have to wait another 1.5 years for this temple’s groundbreaking, until more is known, it seems wiser to be conservative in this estimate.
179. Greater Manila Philippines Temple: Planning and approval; awaiting official name announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2019.
Note: Although this temple may also be further along in its’ progress towards a groundbreaking than other temples above it, in view of the factors noted on the others above this one, it has seemed wiser to be more conservative in my estimate for this temple’s future groundbreaking. Additionally, since getting the Urdaneta Philippines Temple underway may be more of a priority for the Church, this one may only have a groundbreaking within the next 16-19 months.
180. Layton Utah Temple: Announced April 1, 2018; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during late 2019-early 2020.
Note: While I would anticipate that, for this temple in Utah, its’ construction will likely get underway sooner than other temples on this list, and while that could happen sooner than indicated above if the Church confirms that the land that was bought in Layton two days before the temple was announced in that city will serve as the site for that temple, it has seemed wiser to be more conservative in my estimate for this temple’s potential groundbreaking. I will be delighted to move it up on this list if I see a good enough reason to do so.
181. Abidjan Ivory Coast Temple: Planning and approval; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during early 2020.
Note: This is the last of the three temples announced in April 2015 that may have a groundbreaking. The Church in the Ivory Coast has seen sufficient enough growth that a second (and perhaps even a third) temple may be announced to serve the Saints in this nation, but that may not occur until this temple makes further progress. We have seen recent developments on other temples in Africa, which gives me hope that this temple could have a groundbreaking ceremony around the estimated time noted above, but time will tell how accurate that might prove to be.
182. Quito Ecuador Temple: Planning and approval; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during early-to-mid 2020.
Note: While the first Ecuadoran temple had a 14-year wait between its’ announcement and groundbreaking, with the progress the Church has made in South America within the last two decades, this temple (to be built in the Ecuadoran capital city) will likely not see a wait nearly that long. I personally hope that this groundbreaking will occur sooner than indicated above, but until more information is available, I have felt a need to be more conservative.
183. Richmond Virginia Temple: Announced April 1, 2018; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during early-to-mid 2020.
Note: Although an official site confirmation is pending for this temple, a Virginia newspaper noted in mid-April 2018 that the Church had procured several acres of land in Richmond sometime during 2015. If the Church confirms in the near future that one of those plots will be the official temple site, then a groundbreaking could easily occur within the next two years, but possibly less, since temples in the US generally have construction begin well in advance of their international counterparts.
184. Belem Brazil Temple: Planning and approval; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during early-to-mid 2020.
Note: Although this temple was announced one year before the Brasilia Brazil Temple, that temple is further along in the approval process and will likely therefore have its’ groundbreaking before that occurs for this temple. In preparing these updated thoughts, it occurred to me that the Church may opt to hold off on beginning construction of this temple until both the Fortaleza and Rio de Janeiro Temples are dedicated. With that in mind, I have felt that the groundbreaking could occur at around this time, but I will alter this estimate as needed once more is known.
185. Managua Nicaragua Temple: Announced April 1, 2018; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-2020.
Note: Since then-Elder Nelson had publicly proposed this temple in 2012, and President Nelson himself made the announcement, I would imagine the Lord will allow him to be very much involved in the process of this temple’s construction and eventual dedication. With that in mind, I could see a groundbreaking occur within the next 24-27 months, but hopefully sooner if all goes well.
186. Salta Argentina Temple: Announced April 1, 2018; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-2020.
Note: While the time-frames offered for the temples above this one has resulted in this temple’s estimate being delayed as well, it would not surprise me if a groundbreaking for this temple happens sooner than estimated here.
187. Cagayan de Oro Philippines Temple: Announced April 1, 2018; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2020.
Note: While I would anticipate that this temple will likely not have a groundbreaking until significant progress has been made on both the Urdaneta and greater Manila area temples, it is not impossible to believe that a groundbreaking could occur for this newest Filipino temple within the next 2.5-2.75 years, but perhaps sooner if all goes well.
188. Bengaluru India Temple: Announced April 1, 2018; awaiting official site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during early-to-mid 2021.
Note: As previously noted, President Nelson had not originally intended to announce a temple for India during the April 2018 General Conference, but was inspired to do so the night before that conference began. Although India may have some political obstacles that would need to be cleared before this temple has a groundbreaking, I fully anticipate that the Lord could enable a groundbreaking to occur within the next three years, but possibly sooner, especially since President Nelson has also urged the members to hurry and prepare so it can be built.
189. Russia: Announced April 1, 2018; awaiting official location and site announcement; groundbreaking may take place sometime during mid-to-late 2021.
Note: Although both a specific city and a site location for this temple have yet to be identified, President Nelson did have supervisory responsibility for Eastern Europe for the last several years he was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. With that in mind, he may have connections that would enable an acceleration of the process to get this temple built, which is why I am being conservative in my offered estimate above, but will not in any way be surprised if the Lord clears all obstacles to allow that to occur sooner than indicated here.

Final note: If recent statements from Church leaders are any indication, we may soon enter an era where the volume of temple-related developments will be multiplied. If, as has been suggested, President Nelson's legacy as a temple-building prophet outshines and outpaces what we previously saw under President Hinckley's smaller temple plan, we may be in for a season where temple events are held on a more consistent and much wider scale. It will be interesting to see.

Key:
Bolded numbers and text denote temples whose numbers already exists (for renovations), or is certain due to a scheduled dedication, as well as information that is certain, such as dedication or groundbreaking dates.
Italicized numbers and text denote temples whose numbers may change based on the order in which future dedications and groundbreakings are scheduled.
Underlined numbers and text denote temples whose numbers may change based on progress towards planning, approval, and groundbreaking.
Changes since last report are highlighted in red.

Monday, July 23, 2018

Sharing My Answer to a Recent Question

Hello again, everyone! I need to get on my soapbox for a minute. As some of you may know, the Church has been doing more Face-to-Face events for youth and Young Adults. We recently learned that the September 9 Worldwide Devotional for Young Adults would combine with another Face-to-Face event for Young Adults, and would feature Elder Quentin L. Cook of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, along with two representatives from the Church History Department. Set to originate from Nauvoo Illinois, the devotional and Face-to-Face event will showcase a new narrative history of the Church, which is anticipated to be a four-volume set and will be published in coming years.

Now we come to the reason I am getting up on my soapbox. I personally have a problem with one of the question that one young adult asked in preparation for that event. The question posed was why the members of the Quorum of the Twelve no longer serve as missionaries as they did in the early days of the Church.

To me, the question suggests both a misunderstanding of the current evolution of the missionary program, to say nothing of modern Church procedures and the ministry of the apostles. As often as these Brethren can, they are committed to being out among the people of the Church, to finding out what their needs and concerns are, and to using that information to mold the opinions they offer on Church doctrine and policy.

From 2002-2005, we had three members of the Quorum of the Twelve assigned to serve as Area Presidenfots in Chile (Elder Holland) and the Philippines (then-Elder Oaks; both assignments lasting 2 years between 2002-2004) and Europe (Elder L. Tom Perry, for one year). This gave them the chance to observe first-hand day-to-day needs and issues in those areas, which molded their ability to contribute to discussions on policy matters specific to those areas. Also, the Church News recently shared this article, which I have previously mentioned on this blog, about how the ministry of the apostles and the missionaries of the Church have a connection in their worldwide ministry.

With that background in mind, here is the problem I have with that question: First, it used to be very common for the apostles to be missionaries in the early days of the Church, but that was simply because the Church is not as global as it is now. Second, although the apostles were commonly sent out on missions for the first 40-50 years or so of Church history, it was not uncommon for these Brethren to have to leave their families to serve in that way. Recognizing the toll this had taken on the early Brethren, in a revelation to Brigham Young (what we now know as Section 126), this is what the Lord said to him at that time:

"Dear and well-beloved brother, Brigham Young, verily thus saith the Lord unto you: My servant Brigham, it is no more required at your hand to leave your family as in times past, for your offering is acceptable to me.

"I have seen your labor and toil in journeyings for my name.

"I therefore command you to send my word abroad, and take especial care of your family from this time, henceforth and forever. Amen."

So the new direction to the President of the Quorum at that time (which extends to the apostles today) is to send the word abroad (which implies that should be done through the ministry of others), and to take especial care of their families (which would be harder to do if they were involved in full-time missionary work).

That does not, of course, excuse these Brethren from their duty to share their apostolic witness with the world, but when we combine the words of this revelation with what the article cited above shared about the connected and shared role the apostles and the missionaries have, it should be plain that the apostles sending the missionaries (by being inspired about which missionaries should serve in which areas of the world), the extension of a mission call is the Brethren's best way to follow the mandate of sending the word abroad.

But it also comes back to the fact that, with the Church being so much more global now than it was in the early days of the Church when apostles were more easily able to serve long-term as missionaries, if the apostles were to devote more time to doing more missionary work themselves, there would be little or no opportunities to do much else, including seeing to the day-to-day administration of the Church.

This is the same reason that, as I have noted a few times before, apostles could, during the presidency of Spencer W. Kimball, meet personally with those opposing a vote to sustain any general Church leader, but why that would not be possible now. The Church has moved much more fully in the direction of placing more trust and responsibility on local leaders, who at this time, would be better suited to understanding why a local member of their congregation might have a problem sustaining anyone.

The apostles are divinely mandated to share their witness of the Savior with the world, which does involve extensive traveling. But due to the increasingly global nature of the Church, if the apostles took more time than they now do to serve missions, or to meet with those who dissent a sustained proposal, their ability to administer the affairs of the global Church, and to make all the decisions and go through the deliberations pertaining thereunto would be greatly hampered, which in turn would slow to a halt the Church's ability to remain global.

That said, one other major obligations the apostles hold is to unlock the doors of nations to the preaching of the gospel, and in every prayer of dedication relating to such events of which I have read, special mention is made of the missionaries that will serve and the members who will come into the Church in that nation, which means that the prayer of dedication serves as both an extension of their apostolic mandate to take the gospel to the world, in addition to providing the Lord's blessing on the missionaries that current and future apostles will send to such lands.

I apologize if the way I approach such questions come across as insensitive of the individuals who ask them. But what would be practical for a Church that is only present in a handful of nations no longer becomes feasible or wise when the membership of the Church and its' day-to-day administration is on a more global scale.

That said, I recognize that I do not speak for Elder Cook (to whom this question was addressed) or for any of the Brethren, for that matter. They speak for the Lord, while I only ever speak for myself. If that question is one that Elder Cook elects to answer, his answer will likely be given with far more understanding of the one asking the question, the question itself, and how best to answer it.

I appreciate the chance to address this personally, but again, I speak only for myself, and the analysis of the question I provided here may not be in accord with the answer that might be officially provided. That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to do so, please feel free to subscribe to stay informed of new content. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.

Additional Temple Musings

Hello again, everyone! I have two pieces of news to report which has me musing about temples again. So let's talk about that. The LDS Church Temples Facebook page noted today that work continues on the meetinghouse that is the first part of the Winnipeg Manitoba Temple project. It appears that the Church may be placing top priority on the meetinghouse because that is anticipated to be used while the temple proper is under construction.

But I also wanted to pass along new information of which I became aware a week or two ago, which indicated that, unless something unexpected occurs, the construction of that temple is not anticipated to take any longer than the 20-month estimate originally provided by the Church. With that in mind, if all goes well, construction may end in February or March 2020, with a dedication sometime between April and June.

The other development on which I wanted to report is this release from the Canadian Mormon Newsroom, in which it has been reported that President and Sister Nelson will be visiting Winnipeg Manitoba, Montreal Quebec, and Hamilton Ontario. Sister Nelson was born in Alberta, so this will be a homecoming of sorts for her. They will be accompanied by Elder Neil L. and Sister Kathy W. Andersen, and the stops will occur from August 17-19, 2018.

As some of you may recall, when the stops of the Global Ministry Tour taken by the Nelsons and the Hollands in April were announced, many commented that all of the stops but Bengaluru India and Jerusalem were home to announced temples of the Church. During the April General Conference, President Nelson announced a temple for Bengaluru, which no one (least of all he himself) had planned on occurring, though some had speculated about that prospect. The leaders spent some of their time in India scouting for a site for the future temple, which President Nelson indicated he hoped to return to dedicate.

As we also know, there are already temples in Winnipeg & Montreal, but not one in Hamilton Ontario. So I have two takeaway thoughts about this: First, what are the odds that President Nelson could (and possibly will) announce a temple for Hamilton Ontario? Even if they may not have the Church presence there, members in Hamilton currently travel just over 40 miles to attend the temple in Toronto, which may or may not be an arduous or challenging journey.

My reason for broaching that question is, given recent conversations on this blog about President Nelson's ambitious temple-building plans, he may be working towards having every member within 40 miles of a temple, which would be game-changing. It could be no more than coincidence, however.

My second thought is this: President Nelson seems to also want to do more about being out among the people. We saw that occur with his worldwide tour in April, and since he shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon, I am sure that he will be traveling extensively as long as he is able to do so.

And if I may also offer a third thought: As some of you may have realized, between the two lists of most likely prospects for a temple in the near future which I am considering merging for the October General Conference, there were no locations listed in Canada. I had wondered if any Canadian cities were likely to get a temple, but I didn't find any immediate prospects. So I put it to you, my readers: Are there any prospective temple locations in Canada which I should be considering? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below, as your feedback is always most welcome and appreciated.

That does it for this post. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to stay informed of new content (either posts or comments), please feel free to subscribe to receive e-mail updates. Until my next post. I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.


Additional Church News Reported

Hello again, everyone! I wanted to pass along two additional Church news stories, and unfortunately, it is not all good news. Let's dive right in. First, the bad news: Yesterday, during a Sacrament Meeting in Fallon, Nevada (after the administration of the sacrament and as the first speaker began his address), a gunman opened fire on the congregation, killing one man and injuring another. All three men were members of that congregation.

The gunman surrendered to police late yesterday, but the motive for the shooting is unclear. A Church spokesman issued a statement indicating that the general Church leadership is mindful of the situation and will be praying for this congregation in the days ahead, and noted that local leaders have made themselves available to talk to anyone affected by this incident. You can find more details on this story here.

The Church News also reported that another LDS missionary has died while serving. Gavin Paul Zimmerman, who hails from West Haven, Utah, was 19, and had been serving in the Australia Sydney Mission since August 2017. He was with a group that was sightseeing and fell from a cliff. A Church spokesman delivered a statement about Elder Zimmerman's passing, and the parents of Elder Zimmerman did as well.

While it is heartbreaking to hear of a missionary dying in the field, he did so while doing what the Lord wanted him to do, and I have no doubt he is continuing his mission on the other side of the veil. You can read more about this development here.

On the good news front, more information has been released regarding the NAACP's partnership with the Church, which has included additional contextual statements from Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, in addition to the NAACP reaching out to The Debra Bonner Unity Gospel Choir, who performed at the Church's Priesthood Revelation Commemorative Broadcast on June 1. The NAACP requested that the Choir perform at a gathering that recently clarified the extent of that initiative. You can find more details on that story here.

I continue to monitor all Church news and temple developments and will do my level best to bring word of those to you as I learn of them. That does it for this post. Any and all comments are, as always, welcome and appreciated. Thank you for the privilege of your time. If you enjoyed what you read here and would like to stay informed of newly-added content, please feel free to subscribe. Until my next post, I wish each one of you all the best and pray that the Lord will bless you all in everything you do.